Effect of H2S on performance of Pd4Pt alloy membranes

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The effect of H2S on the performance of a hydrogen separation membrane with the composition Pd4Pt was evaluated at 350, 400 and 450°C. Exposure to hydrogen containing 1000 ppm H2S and 10%He resulted in two performance trends. At 350°C, a continuous decline in flux was observed which was attributed to the growth of sulphide corrosion on the membrane surface linked to surface contamination by stainless steel derived particles. At 400 and 450°C, the H2 flux decreased sharply followed by a slow recovery. This trend was attributed to Pt enrichment of the surface resulting from extraction of Pd through the formation ... continued below

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177-185

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Howard, B.H. & Morreale, B.D. January 1, 2008.

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Description

The effect of H2S on the performance of a hydrogen separation membrane with the composition Pd4Pt was evaluated at 350, 400 and 450°C. Exposure to hydrogen containing 1000 ppm H2S and 10%He resulted in two performance trends. At 350°C, a continuous decline in flux was observed which was attributed to the growth of sulphide corrosion on the membrane surface linked to surface contamination by stainless steel derived particles. At 400 and 450°C, the H2 flux decreased sharply followed by a slow recovery. This trend was attributed to Pt enrichment of the surface resulting from extraction of Pd through the formation of Pd4Pt. Also at 400 and 450°C, stainless steel based particle contamination was found to modify and/or enhance the corrosive effects of the H2S containing test gas. The implications of the metallic and/or metal sulphide surface contaminant effects are significant in that these contaminants could result in severe performance degradation and ultimately even mechanical failure.

Physical Description

177-185

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  • Journal Name: Energy Materials; Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 3

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  • Report No.: NETL-TPR2431
  • Grant Number: None
  • DOI: 10.1179/174892309X12519750237717 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1011233
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc836269

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  • January 1, 2008

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • Sept. 22, 2017, 6:28 p.m.

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Howard, B.H. & Morreale, B.D. Effect of H2S on performance of Pd4Pt alloy membranes, article, January 1, 2008; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc836269/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.