DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER

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Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating. ... continued below

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Herman, D. June 3, 2011.

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Description

Funded by the Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management, EM-31, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) partnered with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to develop a filter disk that would withstand a reverse pressure or flow during operation of the rotary microfilter. The ability to withstand a reverse pressure and flow eliminates a potential accident scenario that could have resulted in damage to the filter membranes. While the original welded filter disks have been shown to withstand and reverse pressure/flow in the static condition, the filter disk design discussed in this report will allow a reverse pressure/flow while the disks are rotating. In addition, the laminated disk increases the flexibility during filter startup and cleaning operations. The new filter disk developed by SRNL and SpinTek is manufactured with a more open structure significantly reducing internal flow restrictions in the disk. The prototype was tested at the University of Maryland and demonstrated to withstand the reverse pressure due to the centrifugal action of the rotary filter. The tested water flux of the disk was demonstrated to be 1.34 gpm in a single disk test. By comparison, the water flux of the current disk was 0.49 gpm per disk during a 25 disk test. The disk also demonstrated rejection of solids by filtering a 5 wt % Strontium Carbonate slurry with a filtrate clarity of less the 1.4 Nephelometric Turbidity Units (NTU) throughout the two hour test. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has been working with SpinTek Filtration{trademark} to adapt the rotary microfilter for radioactive service in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. One potential weakness is the loose nature of the membrane on the filter disks. The current disk is constructed by welding the membrane at the outer edge of the disk. The seal for the center of the membrane is accomplished by an o-ring in compression for the assembled stack. The remainder of the membrane is free floating on the disk. This construction requires that a positive pressure be applied to the rotary filter tank to prevent the membrane from rising from the disk structure and potentially contacting the filter turbulence promoter. In addition, one accident scenario is a reverse flow through the filtrate line due to mis-alignment of valves resulting in the membrane rising from the disk structure. The structural integrity of the current disk has been investigated, and shown that the disk can withstand a significant reverse pressure in a static condition. However, the disk will likely incur damage if the filter stack is rotated during a reverse pressure. The development of a laminated disk would have several significant benefits for the operation of the rotary filter including the prevention of a compromise in filter disk integrity during a reverse flow accident, increasing operational flexibility, and increasing the self cleaning ability of the filter. A laminated disk would allow the filter rotor operation prior to a positive pressure in the filter tank. This would prevent the initial dead-head of the filter and prevent the resulting initial filter cake buildup. The laminated disk would allow rotor operation with cleaning fluid, eliminating the need for a recirculation pump. Additionally, a laminated disk would allow a reverse flow of fluid through the membrane pores removing trapped particles.

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  • Report No.: SRNL-STI-2011-00279
  • Grant Number: DE-AC09-08SR22470
  • DOI: 10.2172/1018482 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1018482
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc835042

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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Creation Date

  • June 3, 2011

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 9, 2016, 11:15 p.m.

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Herman, D. DEVELOPMENT OF A LAMINATED DISK FOR THE SPIN TEK ROTARY MICROFILTER, report, June 3, 2011; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc835042/: accessed April 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.