Ion Desorption Stability in Superconducting High Energy Physics Proton Colliders

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In this paper we extend our previous analysis of cold beam tube vacuum in a superconducting proton collider to include ion desorption in addition to thermal desorption and synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption. The new ion desorption terms introduce the possibility of vacuum instability. This is similar to the classical room temperature case but now modified by the inclusion of ion desorption coefficients for cryosorbed (physisorbed) molecules which can greatly exceed the coefficients for tightly bound molecules. The sojourn time concept for physisorbed H{sub 2} is generalized to include photodesorption and ion desorption as well as the usually considered thermal desorption. ... continued below

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Turner, W.C. May 29, 1995.

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In this paper we extend our previous analysis of cold beam tube vacuum in a superconducting proton collider to include ion desorption in addition to thermal desorption and synchrotron radiation induced photodesorption. The new ion desorption terms introduce the possibility of vacuum instability. This is similar to the classical room temperature case but now modified by the inclusion of ion desorption coefficients for cryosorbed (physisorbed) molecules which can greatly exceed the coefficients for tightly bound molecules. The sojourn time concept for physisorbed H{sub 2} is generalized to include photodesorption and ion desorption as well as the usually considered thermal desorption. The ion desorption rate is density dependent and divergent so at the onset of instability the sojourn time goes to zero. Experimental data are used to evaluate the H{sub 2} sojourn time for the conditions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) and the situation is found to be stable. The sojourn time is dominated by photodesorption for surface density s(H{sub 2}) less than a monolayer and by thermal deposition for s(H{sub 2}) greater than a monolayer. For a few percent of a monolayer, characteristic of a beam screen, the photodesorption rate exceeds ion desorption rate by more than two orders of magnitude. The photodesorption rate corresponds to a sojourn time of approximately 100 sec. The paper next turns to the evaluation of stability margins and inclusion of gases heavier than H{sub 2} (CO, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}), where ion desorption introduces coupling between molecular species. Stability conditions are worked out for a simple cold beam tube, a cold beam tube pumped from the ends and a cold beam tube with a co-axial perforated beam screen. In each case a simple inequality for stability of a single component is replaced by a determinant that must be greater than zero for a gas mixture. The connection with the general theory of feedback stability is made and it is shown that the gains of the diagonal uncoupled feedback loops are first order in the ion desorption coefficients whereas the gains of the off diagonal coupled feedback loops are second and higher order. For this reason it turns out that in practical cases stability is dominated by the uncoupled diagonal elements and the inverse of the largest first order closed loop gain is a useful estimate of the margin of stability. In contrast to the case of a simple cold beam tube, the stability condition for a beam screen does not contain the desorption coefficient for physisorbed molecules, even when the screen temperature is low enough that there is a finite surface density of them on the screen surface. Consequently there does not appear to be any particular advantage to operating the beam screen at high enough temperature to avoid physisorption. Numerical estimates of ion desorption stability are given for a number of cases relevant to LHC and all of the ones likely to be encountered were found to be stable. The most important case, a I % transparency beam screen at {approx}4.2 K, was found to have a stability safety margin of approximately thirty determined by ion desorption of CO. Ion desorption of H{sub 2} is about a factor of eighty less stringent than CO. For these estimates the beam tube surface was assumed to be solvent cleaned but otherwise untreated, for example by a very high temperature vacuum bakeout or by glow discharge cleaning.

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A; Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 4

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  • Report No.: LBL-37408
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1001641
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc834833

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  • May 29, 1995

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  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • June 16, 2016, 12:42 p.m.

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Turner, W.C. Ion Desorption Stability in Superconducting High Energy Physics Proton Colliders, article, May 29, 1995; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc834833/: accessed October 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.