Final report SI 08-SI-004: Fusion application targets

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Complex target structures are necessary to take full advantage of the unique laboratory environment created by inertial confinement fusion experiments. For example, uses-of-ignition targets that contain a thin layer of a low density nanoporous material inside a spherical ablator shell allow placing dopants in direct contact with the DT fuel. The ideal foam for this application is a low-density hydrocarbon foam that is strong enough to survive wetting with cryogenic hydrogen, and low enough in density (density less than {approx}30 mg/cc) to not reduce the yield of the target. Here, we discuss the fabrication foam-lined uses-of-ignition targets, and the development ... continued below

Physical Description

PDF-file: 13 pages; size: 0.5 Mbytes

Creation Information

Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, M Y; Dawedeit, C; Worsley, M A; Kim, S H et al. December 3, 2010.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Complex target structures are necessary to take full advantage of the unique laboratory environment created by inertial confinement fusion experiments. For example, uses-of-ignition targets that contain a thin layer of a low density nanoporous material inside a spherical ablator shell allow placing dopants in direct contact with the DT fuel. The ideal foam for this application is a low-density hydrocarbon foam that is strong enough to survive wetting with cryogenic hydrogen, and low enough in density (density less than {approx}30 mg/cc) to not reduce the yield of the target. Here, we discuss the fabrication foam-lined uses-of-ignition targets, and the development of low-density foams that can be used for this application. Much effort has been directed over the last 20 years toward the development of spherical foam targets for direct-drive and fast-ignition experiments. In these targets, the spherical foam shell is used to define the shape of the cryogenic DT fuel layer, or acts as a surrogate to simulate the cryogenic fuel layer. These targets are fabricated from relatively high-density aerogels (>100 mg/cc) and coated with a few micron thick permeation barrier. With exception of the above mentioned fast ignition targets, the wall of these targets is typically larger than 100 microns. In contrast, the fusion application targets for indirect-drive experiments on NIF will require a much thinner foam shell surrounded by a much thicker ablator shell. The design requirements for both types of targets are compared in Table 1. The foam shell targets for direct-drive experiments can be made in large quantities and with reasonably high yields using an encapsulation technique pioneered by Takagi et al. in the early 90's. In this approach, targets are made by first generating unsupported foam shells using a triple-orifice droplet generator, followed by coating the dried foam shells with a thin permeation barrier. However, this approach is difficult, if not impossible, to transfer to the lower density and thinner wall foam shells required for indirect-drive uses-of-ignition targets for NIF that then would have to be coated with an at least hundred-micron-thick ablator film. So far, the thinnest shells that have been fabricated using the triple-orifice-droplet generator technique had a wall thickness of {approx}20 microns, but despite of being made from a higher-density foam formulation, the shells were mechanically very sensitive, difficult to dry, and showed large deviations from roundness. We thus decided to explore a different approach based on using prefabricated thick-walled spherical ablator shells as templates for the thin-walled foam shell. As in the case of the above mentioned encapsulation technique, the foam is made by sol-gel chemistry. However, our approach removes much the requirements on the mechanical stability of the foam shell as the foam shell is never handled in its free-standing form, and promises superior ablator uniformity and surface roughness. As discussed below, the success of this approach depends strongly on the availability of suitable aerogel chemistries (ideally pure hydrocarbon (CH)-based systems) with suitable rheological properties (high viscosity and high modulus near the gel point) that produce low-density and mechanically strong foams.

Physical Description

PDF-file: 13 pages; size: 0.5 Mbytes

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: LLNL-TR-463691
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • DOI: 10.2172/1018439 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1018439
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc834818

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • December 3, 2010

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Dec. 5, 2016, 4:08 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 3

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Biener, J; Kucheyev, S O; Wang, M Y; Dawedeit, C; Worsley, M A; Kim, S H et al. Final report SI 08-SI-004: Fusion application targets, report, December 3, 2010; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc834818/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.