CREEP AND CRACKING ANALYSES OF THE 241-BY-112 REINFORCED CONCRETE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANK

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The 241-BY Tank Farm, located in 200 East Area of the Hanford Project, was designed and constructed in 1948-1949. The 241-BY Tank Farm has 12 reinforced concrete,underground waste tanks, numbered 241-BY-101 to 112. Each tank has an inside, 3/8 inch thick carbon steel liner, for containment of liquid wastes. The capacity of each tank is 758,000 gallons. The reinforced concrete design drawings for the 241-BY Tank (H-2-1312, H-2-1314, and H-2-1315) are reproduced in this report. The 241-BY Tank Farm was originally used to store liquid radioactive wastes with temperatures about 2000 F. For approximately the last five years, the Waste ... continued below

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FR, VOLLERT August 6, 1973.

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  • Hanford Site (Wash.)
    Publisher Info: Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States))
    Place of Publication: Richland, Washington

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Description

The 241-BY Tank Farm, located in 200 East Area of the Hanford Project, was designed and constructed in 1948-1949. The 241-BY Tank Farm has 12 reinforced concrete,underground waste tanks, numbered 241-BY-101 to 112. Each tank has an inside, 3/8 inch thick carbon steel liner, for containment of liquid wastes. The capacity of each tank is 758,000 gallons. The reinforced concrete design drawings for the 241-BY Tank (H-2-1312, H-2-1314, and H-2-1315) are reproduced in this report. The 241-BY Tank Farm was originally used to store liquid radioactive wastes with temperatures about 2000 F. For approximately the last five years, the Waste Management Program has had the In-Tank Solidification Unit No.2 (ITS-2) i{approx}stalled in the 241-BY-112 Tank. With ITS-2, this tank has operated with a liquid temperature of 250 F most of the time. Currently, Operations Support Engineering of Atlantic Richfield Hanford Company believes that ITS-2 could operate more effectively if the liquid in the 241-BY-112 Tank were heated to 280 F. Thus, the subject structural analyses were undertaken to predict how the tank structure responds to the 250 F and the proposed 280 F liquid temperatures. More specifically, the goals of these analyses were: (1) Make a quantitative determination and evaluation of the time dependent creep, cracking, and stresses experienced to date by the 241-BY-112 reinforced concrete structure due to its surrounding soil load and the 2500 F temperature history; and (2) Predict and evaluate future time-dependent creep, cracking, and stresses in the 241-BY-112 concrete structure that would occur if ITS-2 operated with 2800 F liquid in the tank. Based on the analyses results presented herein, the 241-BY-112 reinforced concrete tank structure, with 7 feet of soil cover and operating with 250 F to 280 F liquid contents will experience thermal expansion, and time-dependent creep and cracking. However, the time-dependent cracking is shown to essentially stop progressing when the tank reaches a steady state temperature. The tank structure is stable and has sufficient structural capacity for safe, long-term operation under the temperature and load conditions assumed for these analyses. The conclusions here have the condition that the tank structure experiences no thermal shock, i.e., rapid changes in temperature.

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  • Report No.: ARH-2883
  • Grant Number: AT(45-1)-2130
  • DOI: 10.2172/1024901 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1024901
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc833758

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  • August 6, 1973

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • July 25, 2016, 6:21 p.m.

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FR, VOLLERT. CREEP AND CRACKING ANALYSES OF THE 241-BY-112 REINFORCED CONCRETE UNDERGROUND WASTE STORAGE TANK, report, August 6, 1973; Richland, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc833758/: accessed November 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.