Densification and residual stress induced by CO2 laser-based mitigation of SiO2 surfaces

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Knowing the ultimate surface morphology resulting from CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of induced laser damage is important both for determining adequate treatment protocols, and for preventing deleterious intensification upon subsequent illumination of downstream optics. Physical effects such as evaporation, viscous flow and densification can strongly affect the final morphology of the treated site. Evaporation is a strong function of temperature and will play a leading role in determining pit shapes when the evaporation rate is large, both because of material loss and redeposition. Viscous motion of the hot molten material during heating and cooling can redistribute material due to surface ... continued below

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Feit, M D; Matthews, M J; Soules, T F & Stolken, J S October 21, 2010.

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Knowing the ultimate surface morphology resulting from CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of induced laser damage is important both for determining adequate treatment protocols, and for preventing deleterious intensification upon subsequent illumination of downstream optics. Physical effects such as evaporation, viscous flow and densification can strongly affect the final morphology of the treated site. Evaporation is a strong function of temperature and will play a leading role in determining pit shapes when the evaporation rate is large, both because of material loss and redeposition. Viscous motion of the hot molten material during heating and cooling can redistribute material due to surface tension gradients (Marangoni effect) and vapor recoil pressure effects. Less well known, perhaps, is that silica can densify as a result of structural relaxation, to a degree depending on the local thermal history. The specific volume shrinkage due to structural relaxation can be mistaken for material loss due to evaporation. Unlike evaporation, however, local density change can be reversed by post annealing. All of these effects must be taken into account to adequately describe the final morphology and optical properties of single and multiple-pass mitigation protocols. We have investigated, experimentally and theoretically, the significance of such densification on residual stress and under what circumstances it can compete with evaporation in determining the ultimate post treatment surface shape. In general, understanding final surface configurations requires taking all these factors including local structural relaxation densification, and therefore the thermal history, into account. We find that surface depressions due to densification can dominate surface morphology in the non-evaporative regime when peak temperatures are below 2100K.

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PDF-file: 7 pages; size: 1.1 Mbytes

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  • Presented at: SPIE Laser Damage Conference, Boulder, CO, United States, Sep 26 - Sep 29, 2010

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  • Report No.: LLNL-PROC-461512
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1016928
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc832994

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • October 21, 2010

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  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • Dec. 9, 2016, 9:12 p.m.

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Feit, M D; Matthews, M J; Soules, T F & Stolken, J S. Densification and residual stress induced by CO2 laser-based mitigation of SiO2 surfaces, article, October 21, 2010; Livermore, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc832994/: accessed July 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.