Building Bridges: Collaborative partnerships between institutions of higher education and independent school districts

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Article discussing building collaborative partnerships between institutions of higher education and independent school districts.

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3 p.

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Emmanuel, Donna T. September 2004.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: UNT Scholarly Works and was provided by UNT College of Music to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 240 times . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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UNT College of Music

One of the nation's largest music schools, the UNT College of Music provides a dynamic learning environment for both future professionals and the broader university community. The College of Music offers instruction in the areas of composition studies; conducting and ensembles; instrumental studies; jazz studies; keyboard studies; music education; music history, theory, and ethnomusicology; and vocal studies. With more than fifty performing ensemble groups, a full schedule of student recitals, and frequent visits by guest artists, the college brings music lovers nearly a thousand concert events each year.

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Article discussing building collaborative partnerships between institutions of higher education and independent school districts.

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3 p.

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Abstract: Music education programs in colleges and universities and music programs in public elementary, middle, and high schools have long been partners in spoken and unspoken ways. One of the most common relationships is that of the student-teaching experience in which undergraduate university and college students work with cooperating teachers in the public schools. This type of partnership benefits the university students in many explicit ways, but the benefits for the public school teachers and their students are not so clear. University faculty and students also commonly use schools as sites for research, though often after the research project is over, the "partnership" ends. Even though these types of relationships might commonly be called "partnerships," a true partnership is one in which all parties clearly benefit and all parties share a common goal. These types of partnerships might be termed truly collaborative.

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  • Southwestern Musician, 2004, Austin: Texas Music Educators Association, pp. 56-58

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  • Publication Title: Southwestern Musician
  • Page Start: 56
  • Page End: 58
  • Pages: 3

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UNT Scholarly Works

Materials from the UNT community's research, creative, and scholarly activities and UNT's Open Access Repository. Access to some items in this collection may be restricted.

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  • September 2004

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  • April 13, 2012, 9:48 a.m.

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  • May 12, 2014, 1:56 p.m.

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Emmanuel, Donna T. Building Bridges: Collaborative partnerships between institutions of higher education and independent school districts, article, September 2004; [Austin, Texas]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc83292/: accessed December 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Music.