ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD

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At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In ... continued below

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Neshem, D. O. & Riddelle, J. January 30, 2012.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 16 times , with 4 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Hanford Site (Wash.)
    Publisher Info: Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States))
    Place of Publication: Richland, Washington

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At the Hanford Site, chromium was used as a corrosion inhibitor in the reactor cooling water and was introduced into the groundwater as a result of planned and unplanned discharges from reactors during plutonium production since 1944. Beginning in 1995, groundwater treatment methods were evaluated leading to the use of pump and treat facilities with ion exchange using Dowex 21 K, a regenerable strong base anion exchange resin. This required regeneration of the resin, which is currently performed offsite. Resin was installed in a 4 vessel train, with resin removal required from the lead vessel approximately once a month. In 2007, there were 8 trains (32 vessels) in operation. In 2008, DOE recognized that regulatory agreements would require significant expansion in the groundwater chromium treatment capacity. Previous experience from one of the DOE project managers led to identification of a possible alternative resin, and the contractor was requested to evaluate alternative resins for both cost and programmatic risk reductions. Testing was performed onsite in 2009 and 2010, using a variety of potential resins in two separate facilities with groundwater from specific remediation sites to demonstrate resin performance in the specific groundwater chemistry at each site. The testing demonstrated that a weak base anion single-use resin, ResinTech SIR-700, was effective at removing chromium, had a significantly higher capacity, could be disposed of efficiently on site, and would eliminate the complexities and programmatic risks from sampling, packaging, transportation and return of resin for regeneration. This resin was installed in Hanford's newest groundwater treatment facility, called 100-DX, which began operations in November, 2010, and used in a sister facility, 100-HX, which started up in September of 2011. This increased chromium treatment capacity to 25 trains (100 vessels). The resin is also being tested in existing facilities that utilize Dowex 21 K for conversion to the new resin. This paper will describe the results of the testing, performance in the facilities, continued optimization in the pump and treat facilities, and the estimated savings and non-tangible benefits of the conversion.

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  • WM2012 WASTE MANAGEMENT SYMPOSIUM 02/26/2012 THRU 03/01/2012 PHOENIX AZ

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  • Report No.: CHPRC-1701-FP Rev 0
  • Grant Number: DE-AC06-08RL14788
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1034781
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc832499

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  • January 30, 2012

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • July 25, 2016, 6:20 p.m.

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Neshem, D. O. & Riddelle, J. ADVANCES IN HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM REMOVAL AT HANFORD, article, January 30, 2012; Richland, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc832499/: accessed November 14, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.