IUPAC Periodic Table of Isotopes for the Educational Community

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John Dalton first proposed the concept of atomic weights of the elements in the first decade of the nineteenth century. These atomic weights of the chemical elements were thought of as constants of nature, similar to the speed of light. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the atomic weights of the elements in ascending order of value and used the systematic variation of their chemical properties to produce his Periodic Table of the Elements in 1869. Measurement of atomic weight values became an important chemical activity for a century and a half. Theodore Richards received a Noble Prize for his work in this ... continued below

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E., Holden N.; Holden,N.E. & Coplen,T.B. July 15, 2012.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 564 times , with 29 in the last month . More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • National Nuclear Data Center
    Publisher Info: Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) National Nuclear Data Center
    Place of Publication: [Upton, New York]

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John Dalton first proposed the concept of atomic weights of the elements in the first decade of the nineteenth century. These atomic weights of the chemical elements were thought of as constants of nature, similar to the speed of light. Dmitri Mendeleev arranged the atomic weights of the elements in ascending order of value and used the systematic variation of their chemical properties to produce his Periodic Table of the Elements in 1869. Measurement of atomic weight values became an important chemical activity for a century and a half. Theodore Richards received a Noble Prize for his work in this area. In 1913, Fredrick Soddy found a species of radium, which had an atomic weight value of 228, compared to the familiar radium gas value of 226. Soddy coined the term 'isotope' (Greek for 'in the same place') to account for this second atomic weight value in the radium position of the Periodic Table. Both of these isotopes of radium are radioactive. Radioactive isotopes are energetically unstable and will decay (disintegrate) over time. The time it takes for one half of a sample of a given radioactive isotope to decay is the half-life of that isotope. In addition to having different atomic weight values, radium-226 and radium-228 also have different half-life values. Around the same time as Soddy's work, J.J. Thomson (discoverer of the electron) identified two stable (non-radioactive) isotopes of the same element, neon. Over the next 40 years, the majority of the known chemical elements were found to have two or more stable (or long-lived radioactive isotopes that contribute significantly to the determination of the atomic weights of the elements).

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  • 22nd International Conference on Chemistry Education and the 11th European Conference on Research in Chemical Education.; Rome Italy; 20120715 through 20120720

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  • Report No.: BNL--98115-2012-CP
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-98CH10886
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1049230
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc829940

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  • July 15, 2012

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 9:45 a.m.

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  • July 21, 2016, 6:24 p.m.

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E., Holden N.; Holden,N.E. & Coplen,T.B. IUPAC Periodic Table of Isotopes for the Educational Community, article, July 15, 2012; [Upton, New York]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc829940/: accessed September 24, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.