World-Wide Experience with SRF Facilities

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The speaker will review and analyze the performance of existing SRF facilities in the world, addressing issues of usage and availability for different customers (HEP research, material sciences, ADS). Lessons learned should be summarized for proposed future facilities (ILC, Project X, Muon Collider). The first use of superconducting cavities for accelerating beams was at HEPL, Stanford University in the early sixties. Rather quickly, other laboratories followed suit, notably the University of Illinois at Champagne, Urbana and Cornell University. There were two main uses, which still persist today. The first is to provide accelerated particles as an injector or for fixed ... continued below

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Andrew Hutton, Adam Carpenter March 1, 2011.

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The speaker will review and analyze the performance of existing SRF facilities in the world, addressing issues of usage and availability for different customers (HEP research, material sciences, ADS). Lessons learned should be summarized for proposed future facilities (ILC, Project X, Muon Collider). The first use of superconducting cavities for accelerating beams was at HEPL, Stanford University in the early sixties. Rather quickly, other laboratories followed suit, notably the University of Illinois at Champagne, Urbana and Cornell University. There were two main uses, which still persist today. The first is to provide accelerated particles as an injector or for fixed target experiments. The second is to maintain circulating beams, either for synchrotron light sources or for colliding beam experiments. Given the differing requirements, these two uses led to rather different implementations and, in particular, different average operating gradients. A second difference in the implementation is the speed of the particle being accelerated. Electrons are sufficiently relativistic at low beam energies (> {approx} 5 MeV) that cavities designed for relativistic beams can also function acceptably at low energy. This is not the case for protons or ion accelerators so, until recently, copper cavities were used to cover the first {approx} 100 MeV. Superconducting cavities are now also being proposed to cover this energy range as well using a series of superconducting cavities, each of which is matched to the particle velocity.

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  • 2011 Particle Accelerator Conference (PAC'11), New York, NY, 28 Mar - 1 Apr 2011

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  • Report No.: JLAB-ACC-11-1371
  • Report No.: DOE/OR/23177-1543
  • Grant Number: AC05-06OR23177
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1032456
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc829384

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  • March 1, 2011

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  • May 19, 2016, 3:16 p.m.

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  • Aug. 3, 2016, 8:16 p.m.

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Andrew Hutton, Adam Carpenter. World-Wide Experience with SRF Facilities, article, March 1, 2011; Newport News, Virginia. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc829384/: accessed June 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.