CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES IN HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS

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Computerized procedures (CPs) are an emerging technology within nuclear power plant control rooms. While CPs have been implemented internationally in advanced control rooms, to date no US nuclear power plant has implemented CPs in its main control room. Yet, CPs are a reality of new plant builds and are an area of considerable interest to existing plants, which see advantages in terms of easier records management by omitting the need for updating hardcopy procedures. The overall intent of this paper is to provide a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures. It is beyond the scope of ... continued below

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Boring, Ronald L. & Gertman, David I. July 1, 2012.

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Computerized procedures (CPs) are an emerging technology within nuclear power plant control rooms. While CPs have been implemented internationally in advanced control rooms, to date no US nuclear power plant has implemented CPs in its main control room. Yet, CPs are a reality of new plant builds and are an area of considerable interest to existing plants, which see advantages in terms of easier records management by omitting the need for updating hardcopy procedures. The overall intent of this paper is to provide a characterization of human reliability analysis (HRA) issues for computerized procedures. It is beyond the scope of this document to propose a new HRA approach or to recommend specific methods or refinements to those methods. Rather, this paper serves as a review of current HRA as it may be used for the analysis and review of computerized procedures.

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  • Nuclear Power Instrumentation and Control and Human Machine Interface Technology,San Diego,07/23/2012,07/27/2012

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  • Report No.: INL/CON-12-26092
  • Grant Number: DE-AC07-05ID14517
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1072392
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc828580

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  • July 1, 2012

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  • May 19, 2016, 9:45 a.m.

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  • June 20, 2016, 2:26 p.m.

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Boring, Ronald L. & Gertman, David I. CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE TREATMENT OF COMPUTERIZED PROCEDURES IN HUMAN RELIABILITY ANALYSIS, article, July 1, 2012; Idaho Falls, Idaho. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc828580/: accessed September 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.