Developing highly scalable fluid solvers for enabling multiphysics simulation.

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Description

We performed an investigation into explicit algorithms for the simulation of incompressible flows using methods with a finite, but small amount of compressibility added. Such methods include the artificial compressibility method and the lattice-Boltzmann method. The impetus for investigating such techniques stems from the increasing use of parallel computation at all levels (processors, clusters, and graphics processing units). Explicit algorithms have the potential to leverage these resources. In our investigation, a new form of artificial compressibility was derived. This method, referred to as the Entropically Damped Artificial Compressibility (EDAC) method, demonstrated superior results to traditional artificial compressibility methods by damping ... continued below

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48 p.

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Clausen, Jonathan March 1, 2013.

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This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

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  • Sandia National Laboratories
    Publisher Info: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
    Place of Publication: Albuquerque, New Mexico

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Description

We performed an investigation into explicit algorithms for the simulation of incompressible flows using methods with a finite, but small amount of compressibility added. Such methods include the artificial compressibility method and the lattice-Boltzmann method. The impetus for investigating such techniques stems from the increasing use of parallel computation at all levels (processors, clusters, and graphics processing units). Explicit algorithms have the potential to leverage these resources. In our investigation, a new form of artificial compressibility was derived. This method, referred to as the Entropically Damped Artificial Compressibility (EDAC) method, demonstrated superior results to traditional artificial compressibility methods by damping the numerical acoustic waves associated with these methods. Performance nearing that of the lattice- Boltzmann technique was observed, without the requirement of recasting the problem in terms of particle distribution functions; continuum variables may be used. Several example problems were investigated using a finite-di erence and finite-element discretizations of the EDAC equations. Example problems included lid-driven cavity flow, a convecting Taylor-Green vortex, a doubly periodic shear layer, freely decaying turbulence, and flow over a square cylinder. Additionally, a scalability study was performed using in excess of one million processing cores. Explicit methods were found to have desirable scaling properties; however, some robustness and general applicability issues remained.

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48 p.

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  • Report No.: SAND2013-2608
  • Grant Number: AC04-94AL85000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 1095952
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc828429

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  • March 1, 2013

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • May 19, 2016, 9:45 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • June 17, 2016, 3:08 p.m.

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Clausen, Jonathan. Developing highly scalable fluid solvers for enabling multiphysics simulation., report, March 1, 2013; Albuquerque, New Mexico. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc828429/: accessed September 26, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.