The Reaction Kinetics of Amino Radicals with Sulfur Dioxide

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Abstract: Application of the laser photolysis–laser-induced fluorescence method to the reaction NH2 + SO2 in argon bath gas yields pressure-dependent, third-order kinetics which may be summarized as 𝑘 = (1.49 ± 0.15) × 10^−31 (𝑇/298 K) − 0.83 cm^6 molecule^−2 s^−1 over 292 – 555 K, where the uncertainty is the 95% confidence interval and includes possible systematic errors.The quenching of vibrationally excited NH2 is consistent with a high-pressure limit for NH2 + SO2 of (1.62 ± 0.25) × 10^−11 cm^3 molecule^−1 s^−1 over the temperature range 295–505 K, where again the 95% confidence interval is shown. Abinitio analysis yields ... continued below

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13 p.

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Gao, Yide; Glarborg, Peter & Marshall, Paul Creation Date: Unknown.

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Abstract: Application of the laser photolysis–laser-induced fluorescence method to the reaction NH2 + SO2 in argon bath gas yields pressure-dependent, third-order kinetics which may be summarized as 𝑘 = (1.49 ± 0.15) × 10^−31 (𝑇/298 K) − 0.83 cm^6 molecule^−2 s^−1 over 292 – 555 K, where the uncertainty is the 95% confidence interval and includes possible systematic errors.The quenching of vibrationally excited NH2 is consistent with a high-pressure limit for NH2 + SO2 of (1.62 ± 0.25) × 10^−11 cm^3 molecule^−1 s^−1 over the temperature range 295–505 K, where again the 95% confidence interval is shown. Abinitio analysis yields a H2N – SO2 dissociation enthalpy of 73.5 kJmol−1, and comparison with RRKM theory and the exponential down model for energy transfer yields ⟨Δ𝐸⟩down = 350 cm^−1 for Ar at room temperature.

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13 p.

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  • Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie

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Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Zeitschrift für Physikalische Chemie
  • Volume: 229
  • Issue: 10-12
  • Page Start: 1649
  • Page End: 1661

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • April 29, 2015

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  • June 18, 2015

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  • Feb. 11, 2016, 7:11 a.m.

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  • July 29, 2016, 4:14 p.m.

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Gao, Yide; Glarborg, Peter & Marshall, Paul. The Reaction Kinetics of Amino Radicals with Sulfur Dioxide, text, Date Unknown; (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc801965/: accessed May 27, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Arts and Sciences.