Journal of Near-Death Studies, Volume 16, Number 1, Fall 1997

One of 800 issues in the title: Journal of Near-Death Studies available on this site.

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Description

Quarterly journal publishing papers related to near-death experiences, including research reports; theoretical or conceptual statements; expressions of a scientific, philosophic, religious, or historical perspective on the study of near-death experiences; cross-cultural studies; individual case histories; and personal accounts of experiences or related phenomena.

Physical Description

96 p. ; 23 cm.

Creation Information

Greyson, Bruce Autumn 1997.

Context

This periodical is part of the collection entitled: Journal of Near-Death Studies and was provided by UNT Libraries to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 63 times , with 7 in the last month . More information about this issue can be viewed below.

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Editor

  • Greyson, Bruce Bruce Greyson, M.D., University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Editor

  • Straight, Steve Associate Editor; Steve Straight, M.A., Manchester Community College, Manchester, CT

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Description

Quarterly journal publishing papers related to near-death experiences, including research reports; theoretical or conceptual statements; expressions of a scientific, philosophic, religious, or historical perspective on the study of near-death experiences; cross-cultural studies; individual case histories; and personal accounts of experiences or related phenomena.

Physical Description

96 p. ; 23 cm.

Notes

Pagination is continuous through this volume.

Language

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this issue in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • OCLC: 14781775 | External Link
  • ISSN: 0891-4494
  • Library of Congress Control Number: 88-648131
  • Library of Congress Control Number: sn 86-2701
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc799439

Publication Information

  • Publication Title: Journal of Near-Death Studies
  • Volume: 16
  • Issue: 1
  • Pages: 96

Relationships

Collections

This issue is part of the following collection of related materials.

Journal of Near-Death Studies

The Journal of Near-Death Studies is a scholarly peer-reviewed journal devoted to the field of near-death studies. It is published on a quarterly basis by the International Association for Near-Death Studies. The Journal began publication in 1982 under the name Anabiosis which was changed to its current title in 1986 with the start of Volume 6.

Related Items

Comments on "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor" (Article)

Comments on "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor"

Abstract: Although ketamine can induce a state similar to a near-death experience (NDE), there is a striking difference between experiences induced by ketamine used in a recreational context and in an operating room. Ketamine is a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptro, as is ibogaine, the main alkaloid of a shrub used in Central Africa to induce NDEs in a religious context. Ibogaine can also elicit different experiences when used in a hallucinatory context or in initiatic rituals, where a superficial state of coma is induced. These data raise the question of whether the chemically-induced NDE-like experience is related to the use of a particular kind of substance or to a genuine comatose state.

Relationship to this item: (Has Part)

The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor, ark:/67531/metadc798994

Endogenous Ketamine-Like Compounds and the NDE: If So, So What? (Article)

Endogenous Ketamine-Like Compounds and the NDE: If So, So What?

Article offering commentary on Karl Jansen's ketamine model for the near-death experience, expanding upon and raising additional questions about several issues and hypotheses.

Relationship to this item: (Has Part)

Endogenous Ketamine-Like Compounds and the NDE: If So, So What?, ark:/67531/metadc799090

Is the Near-Death Experience Only N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Blocking? (Article)

Is the Near-Death Experience Only N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Blocking?

Article examining Karl Jansen's hypothesis that near-death experiences (NDEs) result from blockade of the N-methyl-D-asparate receptor.

Relationship to this item: (Has Part)

Is the Near-Death Experience Only N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Blocking?, ark:/67531/metadc799245

Which Comes First: Consciousness or Aspartate Receptors? (Article)

Which Comes First: Consciousness or Aspartate Receptors?

Abstract: This paper is a critique of Karl Jansen's hypothesis that near-death and ketamine experiences are caused by blockade of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. An assumption that consciousness and its alterations are merely the product of neuronal activity is only one of many possible beliefs about reality. An alternative, which can be verified through one's own direct experiences, is that consciousness is always a subject and body is only its object. The objects come and go; consciousness remains.

Relationship to this item: (Has Part)

Which Comes First: Consciousness or Aspartate Receptors?, ark:/67531/metadc799285

Commentary on Jansen's Paper (Article)

Commentary on Jansen's Paper

Abstract: Karl Jansen raises a fundamental and exciting question: Is humankind's consciousness the result of neuronal function, or are there extracerebral aspects as well? While his neurotransmitter model of near-death experiences (NDEs) is well described, I find his supporting evidence weak. Methodological differences between studies of ketamine hallucinations and near-death experiences (NDEs) raise doubts about how similar those experiences are phenomenologically. While Jansen's model has electrifying implications, the data required to support his conclusions do not yet exist.

Relationship to this item: (Has Part)

Commentary on Jansen's Paper, ark:/67531/metadc799018

Discussion of "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Rold for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor," by Karl L. R. Jansen (Article)

Discussion of "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Rold for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor," by Karl L. R. Jansen

Abstract: We review strengths and weaknesses of Karl Jansen's approach to the near-death experience (NDE). Strengths include his limited goals and avoidance of the trap of explaining all features of the NDE with his theory, although he surprisingly misunderstood our previously published position. Additional, we applaud the possible intersection of psychological and biological theories, demonstrated in Jansen's biochemical explanations for the individualized variations in manifestation and adaptive role of the NDE. However, he failed to take into account the pitfalls in the use of analogy, modeling oversimplification, and in taking association as causality and causes as meaningful, in the arguments for his theory.

Relationship to this item: (Has Part)

Discussion of "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor", ark:/67531/metadc799261

Comments on "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor" (Article)

Comments on "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor"

Abstract: Although ketamine can induce a state similar to a near-death experience (NDE), there is a striking difference between experiences induced by ketamine used in a recreational context and in an operating room. Ketamine is a noncompetitive antagonist of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptro, as is ibogaine, the main alkaloid of a shrub used in Central Africa to induce NDEs in a religious context. Ibogaine can also elicit different experiences when used in a hallucinatory context or in initiatic rituals, where a superficial state of coma is induced. These data raise the question of whether the chemically-induced NDE-like experience is related to the use of a particular kind of substance or to a genuine comatose state.

Relationship to this item: (Has Part)

Comments on "The Ketamine Model of the Near-Death Experience: A Central Role for the N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor", ark:/67531/metadc798994

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Creation Date

  • Autumn 1997

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Jan. 26, 2016, 7:14 p.m.

Description Last Updated

  • May 29, 2018, 3:48 p.m.

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Greyson, Bruce. Journal of Near-Death Studies, Volume 16, Number 1, Fall 1997, periodical, Autumn 1997; New York, New York. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc799439/: accessed July 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; .