Semidiurnal solar tides in the mountain atmosphere

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Harmonic analysis of Doppler radar wind profiler data west of the Rocky Mountains has identified a coherent semidiurnal wind system above the wintertime boundary layer at multiple sites in the region. The unusual characteristics of this mountain wind system (its semidiurnal frequency, amplitude, phase, and direction of rotation) suggest that is is a semidiurnal solar tide. Such tides have not been previously documented in the mountain atmosphere or in the troposphere generally but, because semidiurnal signatures are well known in surface barometric traces, and large amplitude semidiurnal tides are known in the upper atmosphere, they are not unexpected. Our future ... continued below

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7 p.

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Whiteman, C.D. & Bian, X. September 1, 1994.

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  • Pacific Northwest Laboratory
    Publisher Info: Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Richland, Washington

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Description

Harmonic analysis of Doppler radar wind profiler data west of the Rocky Mountains has identified a coherent semidiurnal wind system above the wintertime boundary layer at multiple sites in the region. The unusual characteristics of this mountain wind system (its semidiurnal frequency, amplitude, phase, and direction of rotation) suggest that is is a semidiurnal solar tide. Such tides have not been previously documented in the mountain atmosphere or in the troposphere generally but, because semidiurnal signatures are well known in surface barometric traces, and large amplitude semidiurnal tides are known in the upper atmosphere, they are not unexpected. Our future research on this semidiurnal cordilleran wind system will focus on obtaining sufficient data to resolve further the vertical structure, seasonal variation, and spatial variations of the wind system. Of particular interest is the role of the Rocky Mountains and other cordilleras in modifying the global tides. It remains to be seen whether semidiurnal cordilleran circulations will be of sufficient magnitude to be observed across major arcuate-shaped east-west-oriented mountain massifs such as the Alps. There, wind systems may develop in response to pressure gradients (Frei and Davies, 1993) that form across the Alps due to differences in the amplitudes and phases of semidiurnal and diurnal pressure oscillations on the north and south sides of the mountain barrier.

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7 p.

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OSTI as DE95014636

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  • International conference on urban energy: efficient buildings, Beijing (China), 6-10 Sep 1994

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  • Other: DE95014636
  • Report No.: PNL-SA--23513
  • Report No.: CONF-940960--1
  • Grant Number: AC06-76RL01830
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 93558
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc794578

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  • September 1, 1994

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 19, 2015, 7:14 p.m.

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  • April 7, 2016, 4:48 p.m.

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Whiteman, C.D. & Bian, X. Semidiurnal solar tides in the mountain atmosphere, article, September 1, 1994; Richland, Washington. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc794578/: accessed October 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.