A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California

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This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation ... continued below

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Quinn, Nigel W.T. & Hanna, W. Mark October 16, 2001.

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Description

This paper describes the development of a comprehensive flow and salinity monitoring system and application of a decision support system (DSS) to improve management of seasonal wetlands in the San Joaquin Valley of California. The Environmental Protection Agency regulates salinity discharges from non-point sources to the San Joaquin River using a procedure known as the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) to allocate the assimilative capacity of the River for salt among watershed sources. Management of wetland sources of salt load will require the development of monitoring systems, more integrative management strategies and coordination with other entities. To obtain local cooperation the Grassland Water District, whose primary function is to supply surface water to private duck clubs and managed wetlands, needs to communicate to local landowners the likely impacts of salinity regulation on the long term health and function of wildfowl habitat. The project described in this paper will also provide this information. The models that form the backbone of the DSS develop salinity balances at both a regional and local scale. The regional scale concentrates on deliveries to and exports from the Grasland Water District while the local scale focuses on an individual wetland unit where more intensive monitoring is being conducted. The design of the DSS is constrained to meet the needs of busy wetland managers and is being designed from the bottom up utilizing tools and procedures familiar to these individuals.

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  • Journal Name: Environmental Modeling and Software; Journal Volume: 18; Journal Issue: 6; Related Information: Journal Publication Date: 2003

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  • Report No.: LBNL--49206
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 861574
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc793354

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • October 16, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 19, 2015, 7:14 p.m.

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  • Dec. 9, 2016, 9:12 p.m.

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Quinn, Nigel W.T. & Hanna, W. Mark. A decision support system for adaptive real-time management ofseasonal wetlands in California, article, October 16, 2001; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793354/: accessed October 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.