IMPACTS OF SOLUBILITY AND OTHER GEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES ON RADIONUCLIDE RETARDATION IN THE NATURAL SYSTEM

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This report documents results and findings of a study of solubility/co-precipitation effects and enhanced sorption due to variations in redox conditions on radionuclide transport in the natural system (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173951]; BSC 2005 [DIRS 173859]) conducted in response to DOE Contracting Officer Authorization Letter 05-001, Item d (Mitchell 2005 [DIRS 173265]). The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impacts of precipitation and enhanced sorption due to variations in redox conditions on radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain. The information presented in this report is intended to aid in assessing the conservatism in ... continued below

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Arnold, B. August 2, 2005.

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This report documents results and findings of a study of solubility/co-precipitation effects and enhanced sorption due to variations in redox conditions on radionuclide transport in the natural system (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173951]; BSC 2005 [DIRS 173859]) conducted in response to DOE Contracting Officer Authorization Letter 05-001, Item d (Mitchell 2005 [DIRS 173265]). The purpose of this study is to assess the potential impacts of precipitation and enhanced sorption due to variations in redox conditions on radionuclide transport in the saturated zone (SZ) at Yucca Mountain. The information presented in this report is intended to aid in assessing the conservatism in the SZ transport model for supporting the total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations. A similar study was performed for the impact of solubility/precipitation on radionuclide transport in the unsaturated zone (UZ). However, because the unsaturated zone is under predominantly oxidizing conditions and that the radionuclides released from the engineered barrier system are not expected to precipitate in the UZ for the reasons described below, it was concluded that the effect on unsaturated zone transport is not significant to warrant a detailed study. Solubility limiting conditions for neptunium in the UZ are expected to be similar to the conditions for neptunium solubility in the waste emplacement drift invert, where Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} is recommended as the controlling solid phase (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174566], Section 6.6.1). Solubility limits for neptunium inside the waste package, however, are expected to be controlled by NpO{sub 2} (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174566], Section 6.6.1). The solubility limits for Np2O5 are generally much higher than for NpO{sub 2} (BSC 2005 [DIRS 174566], Tables 6.6-4 and 6.6-7). Therefore, the low concentrations of neptunium releases from waste packages are unlikely to be affected by solubility limits in the unsaturated zone. The SZ is part of the Lower Natural Barrier to the migration of radionuclides and to the exposure of the potential receptor population in two ways. First, delay in the release of radionuclides to the accessible environment during transport in the SZ allows radioactive decay to diminish the mass of radionuclides that is ultimately released. In addition, dilution of radionuclide concentrations in groundwater used by the potential receptor population occurs during transport in the saturated zone and in the process of producing groundwater from wells.

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  • Report No.: NA
  • Grant Number: NA
  • DOI: 10.2172/862269 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 862269
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc793019

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  • August 2, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 19, 2015, 7:14 p.m.

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  • Nov. 29, 2016, 2:14 p.m.

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Arnold, B. IMPACTS OF SOLUBILITY AND OTHER GEOCHEMICAL PROCESSES ON RADIONUCLIDE RETARDATION IN THE NATURAL SYSTEM, report, August 2, 2005; Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc793019/: accessed December 18, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.