New Metal Niobate and Silicotitanate Ion Exchangers: Development and Characterization

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This project is a continuing EMSP project entitled ''New Silicotitanate Waste Forms: Development and Characterization.'' In our original study, the phase selection and chemical durability of silicotitanates (including commercially available IE-911) as a function of temperature (500 to 1000 C) was fully characterized by a combination of techniques including XRD, TEM, SEM, NMR, Raman spectroscopy, XAFS, XANES, and by thermodynamic studies. In addition, work on this program led to new discoveries not anticipated in the originally proposed research. Of particular importance was the discovery of a new ion exchange material that is selective for divalent cations under extreme conditions (e.g., ... continued below

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Su, Yali; Nenoff, Tina M. & Navrotsky, Alexandra June 1, 2001.

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Description

This project is a continuing EMSP project entitled ''New Silicotitanate Waste Forms: Development and Characterization.'' In our original study, the phase selection and chemical durability of silicotitanates (including commercially available IE-911) as a function of temperature (500 to 1000 C) was fully characterized by a combination of techniques including XRD, TEM, SEM, NMR, Raman spectroscopy, XAFS, XANES, and by thermodynamic studies. In addition, work on this program led to new discoveries not anticipated in the originally proposed research. Of particular importance was the discovery of a new ion exchange material that is selective for divalent cations under extreme conditions (e.g., acid solutions, competing cations), thus providing an alternative for removing Sr from mixed wastes. This material is converted easily by high-temperature, in situ heat treatment into a perovskite phase, which is also a major component of Synroc, a titanate ceramic waste form used for sequestration of high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessed, spent nuclear fuel. This renewal project is based on the current needs in separation of cesium and strontium and the results obtained from our previous EMSP work. The purpose of this project is to deliver pertinent information that can be used to make rational decisions on selection of separation processes for cesium, strontium, and actinides. The objectives of this project are: (1) to establish the structure/property relationship between inorganic ion exchanger materials and their ability to selectively separate divalent cations under extreme operating conditions-This includes optimizing stoichiometry, synthesis, and pretreatment conditions for metal niobate and silicotitanate ion exchangers for maximum strontium and actinide-surrogate selectivity. (2) to fully characterize the phase relationships, structures, and thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of these new phases and their related condensed phases (as potential ceramic waste forms) (3) to understand the chemical and thermodynamic stabilities of silicotitanate ion exchangers based on an in-depth comprehension of local bonding configurations and thermochemistry (4) to apply fundamental understanding to tailoring an ion exchanger that is ideally suited for a DOE needs and therefore has the potential for short-term deployment in the DOE complex.

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2001

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  • Report No.: EMSP-73748--2001
  • Grant Number: FG07-97ER45674
  • DOI: 10.2172/833731 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 833731
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc788966

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  • June 1, 2001

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • April 21, 2016, 7:40 p.m.

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Su, Yali; Nenoff, Tina M. & Navrotsky, Alexandra. New Metal Niobate and Silicotitanate Ion Exchangers: Development and Characterization, report, June 1, 2001; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc788966/: accessed September 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.