LLRW Management Challenges at a Large Research University

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

In the performance of its mission as a world-class teaching and research institution, the University of Michigan (U-M) generates a variety of Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams. The management of these wastes (i.e. packaging, transportation, processing and disposal) has a direct impact on a large research university that other, conventional generators may not appreciate. The university is actually a small generator compared with the likes of utility companies and government agencies. Yet experience has shown that universities require unique service support for the management of a wide range, albeit smaller quantities of LLRW streams. Unlike larger LLRW generators with ... continued below

Physical Description

6 pages

Creation Information

Cullen, T.R. February 25, 2003.

Context

This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this article or its content.

Author

Publishers

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this article. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

In the performance of its mission as a world-class teaching and research institution, the University of Michigan (U-M) generates a variety of Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) streams. The management of these wastes (i.e. packaging, transportation, processing and disposal) has a direct impact on a large research university that other, conventional generators may not appreciate. The university is actually a small generator compared with the likes of utility companies and government agencies. Yet experience has shown that universities require unique service support for the management of a wide range, albeit smaller quantities of LLRW streams. Unlike larger LLRW generators with specialized cadres of employees dealing with LLRW issues, a research university is likely to have these same responsibilities handled by a small team of specialists requiring a variety of skill sets. The diversity of waste generated is reflective of the number and variety of waste generators on campus. With over 1500 medical research and teaching laboratories and a research reactor, the LLRW waste streams the U-M generates include significant volumes of solid, long- and short-lived waste as well as liquid mixed waste and non-hazardous aqueous waste. As a result of this diversity of waste streams, the U-M must meet compliance standards established by the NRC, EPA, DOT and the State of Michigan. Like other LLRW generators within the State of Michigan, the U-M was unable to ship LLRW for disposal from late 1991 through mid-1995 due to political restrictions imposed by the federal government relating to the state compact legislation. This resulted in a large quantity of LLRW and mixed waste shipped for processing and disposal beginning in mid-1996. The U-M, along with other small quantity generators must compete for access to the diminishing space remaining at the Barnwell Disposal Facility. The key to success in this area requires a combination of institutional long-range planning and having a knowledgeable broker working on your behalf.

Physical Description

6 pages

Source

  • Waste Management 2003 Symposium, Tucson, AZ (US), 02/23/2003--02/27/2003

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this article in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: none
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 827595
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc788640

Collections

This article is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this article?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this article.

Creation Date

  • February 25, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • April 27, 2016, 1:36 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this article last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 3

Interact With This Article

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

Cullen, T.R. LLRW Management Challenges at a Large Research University, article, February 25, 2003; Tucson, Arizona. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc788640/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.