In situ microbial volatilization of selenium in soils: A case history

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A pilot-scale field experiment has been conducted since 1990 to test the effectiveness of microbial volatilization in removing selenium (Se) from soils contaminated with agricultural drainage water. The experiment, in which only irrigation and aeration were employed to enhance microbial processes, was designed to measure all major Se fluxes, including not only selenium loss via volatilization, but also advection with infiltrating rainwater, evapotranspirative transport, and plant uptake. The goal was to account for the total Se mass balance and address questions as to the significance of microbial volatilization relative to other fluxes. Although data collected from 1990 to 1994 showed ... continued below

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6 pages

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Zawislanski, Peter T.; Benson, Sally M.; Jayaweera, Gamani R.; Wu, L. & Frankenberger, William T. January 2, 1999.

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Description

A pilot-scale field experiment has been conducted since 1990 to test the effectiveness of microbial volatilization in removing selenium (Se) from soils contaminated with agricultural drainage water. The experiment, in which only irrigation and aeration were employed to enhance microbial processes, was designed to measure all major Se fluxes, including not only selenium loss via volatilization, but also advection with infiltrating rainwater, evapotranspirative transport, and plant uptake. The goal was to account for the total Se mass balance and address questions as to the significance of microbial volatilization relative to other fluxes. Although data collected from 1990 to 1994 showed decreases of Se concentrations in the top soil, subsequent data demonstrated that advective Se fluxes due to rainwater infiltration and evapotranspiration are largely responsible for the observed changes. Se volatilization was measured to account for an annual loss of only about 1%, with volatilization rates decreasing significantly with time, presumably due to the depletion of soil organic carbon. The integrated results of this project demonstrate the advantages and even necessity of an inter-disciplinary and multi-phase approach to evaluating the effectiveness of bioremediation strategies. Extreme caution needs to be taken in interpreting early results; long-term data collection and follow-up are indispensable.

Physical Description

6 pages

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OSTI as DE00841051

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  • 5th International Symposium of the In-Situ and On-Site Bioremediation, San Diego, CA (US), 04/19/1999--04/21/1999

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  • Report No.: LBNL--44163
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 841051
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc788269

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • January 2, 1999

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Sept. 25, 2017, 4:08 p.m.

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Zawislanski, Peter T.; Benson, Sally M.; Jayaweera, Gamani R.; Wu, L. & Frankenberger, William T. In situ microbial volatilization of selenium in soils: A case history, article, January 2, 1999; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc788269/: accessed December 14, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.