Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: ... continued below

Physical Description

3583 Kilobytes pages

Creation Information

Matsuzaki, Satoshi December 19, 2004.

Context

This thesis or dissertation is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this document can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this thesis or dissertation or its content.

Publisher

  • Ames Laboratory
    Publisher Info: Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Ames, Iowa

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this thesis or dissertation. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Presented in this dissertation is the successful demonstration that nonphotochemical hole burning (NPWB) imaging can be used to study in vitro tissue cellular systems for discerning differences in cellular ultrastructures due to cancer development. This has been accomplished with the surgically removed cancerous ovarian and analogous normal peritoneal tissues from the same patient and the application of a fluorescent mitochondrion specific dye, Molecular Probe MitoFluor Far Red 680 (MF680), commonly known as rhodamine 800, that has been proven to exhibit efficient NPHB. From the results presented in Chapters 4 and 5 , and Appendix B, the following conclusions were made: (1) fluorescence excitation spectra of MF680 and confocal microscopy images of thin sliced tissues incubated with MF680 confirm the site-specificity of the probe molecules in the cellular systems. (2) Tunneling parameters, {lambda}{sub 0} and {sigma}{sub {lambda}}, as well as the standard hole burning parameters (namely, {gamma} and S), have been determined for the tissue samples by hole growth kinetics (HGK) analyses. Unlike the preliminary cultured cell studies, these parameters have not shown the ability to distinguish tissue cellular matrices surrounding the chromophores. (3) Effects of an external electric (Stark) field on the nonphotochemical holes have been used to determine the changes in permanent dipole moment (f{Delta}{mu}) for MF680 in tissue samples when burn laser polarization is parallel to the Stark field. Differences are detected between f{Delta}{mu}s in the two tissue samples, with the cancerous tissue exhibiting a more pronounced change (1.35-fold increase) in permanent dipole moment change relative to the normal analogs. It is speculated that the difference may be related to differences in mitochondrial membrane potentials in these tissue samples. (4) In the HGK mode, hole burning imaging (HBI) of cells adhered to coverslips and cooled to liquid helium temperatures in the complete absence of cryopreservatives, shows the ability to distinguish between carcinoma and analogous normal cells on the single-cell level. In future applications, this system has the potential to be used with smears of tissue samples for single-layer HBI analysis. These conclusions demonstrate that HBI has the potential of providing detailed information about localized intracellular environments and for detecting changes in the physical characteristics (e.g., electrical properties) of cells which constitute the in vitro tissue samples. For the latter, the long-term goal will be to develop NPHB into a diagnostic technique for the early detection of cancer by exploiting the physical differences between normal and cancerous cells and tissues. Moreover, because of the aforementioned HBI's capability to detect cellular anomalies, it has the potential of being used in conjunction with studies involving photodynamic therapy, assuming the chromophore is carefully selected.

Physical Description

3583 Kilobytes pages

Notes

OSTI as DE00837275

Source

  • Other Information: TH: Thesis (Ph.D.); Submitted to Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (US)

Language

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this document in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: IS-T 2692
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-82
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 837275
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc786101

Collections

This document is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this thesis or dissertation?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this thesis or dissertation.

Creation Date

  • December 19, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • June 10, 2016, 6:01 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this document last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 0
Total Uses: 4

Interact With This Thesis Or Dissertation

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

International Image Interoperability Framework

IIF Logo

We support the IIIF Presentation API

Matsuzaki, Satoshi. Hole Burning Imaging Studies of Cancerous and Analogous Normal Ovarian Tissues Utilizing Organelle Specific Dyes, thesis or dissertation, December 19, 2004; Ames, Iowa. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc786101/: accessed October 23, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.