Gordon Research Conference on Genetic Toxicology

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Genetic toxicology represents a study of the genetic damage that a cell can incur, the agents that induce such damage, the damage response mechanisms available to cells and organisms, and the potential consequences of such damage. Genotoxic agents are abundant in the environment and are also induced endogenously. The consequences of such damage can include carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. An understanding of genetic toxicology is essential to carry out risk evaluations of the impact of genotoxic agents and to assess how individual genetic differences influence the response to genotoxic damage. In recent years, the importance of maintaining genomic stability has become ... continued below

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12 pages

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Jeggo, Project Director Penelope February 15, 2003.

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Description

Genetic toxicology represents a study of the genetic damage that a cell can incur, the agents that induce such damage, the damage response mechanisms available to cells and organisms, and the potential consequences of such damage. Genotoxic agents are abundant in the environment and are also induced endogenously. The consequences of such damage can include carcinogenesis and teratogenesis. An understanding of genetic toxicology is essential to carry out risk evaluations of the impact of genotoxic agents and to assess how individual genetic differences influence the response to genotoxic damage. In recent years, the importance of maintaining genomic stability has become increasingly recognized, in part by the realization that failure of the damage response mechanisms underlies many, if not all, cancer incidence. The importance of these mechanisms is also underscored by their remarkable conservation between species, allowing the study of simple organisms to provide significant input into our understanding of the underlying mechanisms. It has also become clear that the damage response mechanisms interface closely with other aspects of cellular metabolism including replication, transcription and cell cycle regulation. Moreover, defects in many of these mechanisms, as observed for example in ataxia telangiectasia patients, confer disorders with associated developmental abnormalities demonstrating their essential roles during growth and development. In short, while a decade ago, a study of the impact of DNA damage was seen as a compartmentalized area of cellular research, it is now appreciated to lie at the centre of an array of cellular responses of crucial importance to human health. Consequently, this has become a dynamic and rapidly advancing area of research. The Genetic Toxicology Gordon Research Conference is biannual with an evolving change in the emphasis of the meetings. From evaluating the nature of genotoxic chemicals, which lay at the centre of the early conferences, the emphasis has moved to understanding how cells and organisms respond to the different forms of genotoxic damage incurred. By understanding these mechanisms, the risk to humans can be more rationally assessed and evaluated. More recently, the format of the meetings have aimed to facilitate input from the range of disciplines that can now provide insight into the field. This evolution in emphasis has been continued in the format of the proposed 2003 meeting. In the last Genetic Toxicology Gordon Conference (2001), the aim was to integrate studies on genetic toxicology at the structural, molecular and cellular level with those involving mice and humans (2 micron to Man). In the 2003 conference, we aim to integrate the approaches from 2 micron to man together with approaches where our basic knowledge has been exploited in an applied context (2 micron to Man to manipulation).

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12 pages

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OSTI as DE00823001

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  • Gordon Conference on Genetic Toxicology, Oxford (GB), 08/10/2003--08/15/2003

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  • Report No.: NONE
  • Grant Number: FG02-03ER63547
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 823001
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc786067

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  • February 15, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Jan. 3, 2017, 12:38 p.m.

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Jeggo, Project Director Penelope. Gordon Research Conference on Genetic Toxicology, article, February 15, 2003; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc786067/: accessed November 14, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.