Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of Los Alamos National Laboratory Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions

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Abstract: The risk of accidental detonation is present whenever any type of high explosives processing activity is performed. These activities are typically carried out indoors to protect processing equipment from the weather and to hide possibly secret processes from view. Often, highly strengthened reinforced concrete buildings are employed to house these activities. These buildings may incorporate several design features, including the use of lightweight frangible blowout panels, to help mitigate blast effects. These panels are used to construct walls that are durable enough to withstand the weather, but are of minimal weight to provide overpressure relief by quickly moving outwards ... continued below

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xii, 145 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

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Wilke, Jason P.; Pohs, Keith G. & Plumlee, Deidré A. September 2005.

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This thesis or dissertation is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 34 times . More information about this document can be viewed below.

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  • Main Title: Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of Los Alamos National Laboratory Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions
  • Alternate Title: Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of LANL Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions

Description

Abstract: The risk of accidental detonation is present whenever any type of high explosives processing activity is performed. These activities are typically carried out indoors to protect processing equipment from the weather and to hide possibly secret processes from view. Often, highly strengthened reinforced concrete buildings are employed to house these activities. These buildings may incorporate several design features, including the use of lightweight frangible blowout panels, to help mitigate blast effects. These panels are used to construct walls that are durable enough to withstand the weather, but are of minimal weight to provide overpressure relief by quickly moving outwards and creating a vent area during an accidental explosion. In this study the behavior of blowout panels under various blast loading conditions was examined. External loadings from explosions occurring in nearby rooms were of primary interest. Several reinforcement systems were designed to help blowout panels resist failure from external blast loads while still allowing them to function as vents when subjected to internal explosions. The reinforcements were studied using two analytical techniques, yield-line analysis and modal analysis, and the hydrocode AUTODYN. A blowout panel reinforcement design was created that could prevent panels from being blown inward by external explosions. This design was found to increase the internal loading of the building by 20%, as compared with nonreinforced panels. Nonreinforced panels were found to increase the structural loads by 80% when compared to an open wall at the panel location.

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xii, 145 p. : ill. ; 28 cm.

Notes

"This work was performed for the Department of Energy under contract No. 87083-001-03 4X."

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  • Report No.: LA-14196-T
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-36
  • Grant Number: 87083-001-03 4X
  • DOI: 10.2172/861281 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 861281
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc785176

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • September 2005

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • March 10, 2016, 2:29 p.m.

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Wilke, Jason P.; Pohs, Keith G. & Plumlee, Deidré A. Effects of Various Blowout Panel Configurations on the Structural Response of Los Alamos National Laboratory Building 16-340 to Internal Explosions, thesis or dissertation, September 2005; Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc785176/: accessed November 22, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.