ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL SOURCE-RECEPTOR RELATIONSHIPS: THE ROLE OF COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS

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This report describes the technical progress made on the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS) during the period of September 2004 through February 2005. Significant progress was made this project period on the analysis of ambient data, source apportionment, and deterministic modeling activities. The major experimental achievement this project period was the characterization of the mercury and fine particle emissions from two modern, large, commercial pulverized coal boilers. This testing completes the field work component of the Source Characterization Activity. This report highlights results from mercury emission measurements made using a dilution sampler. The measurements clearly indicate that mercury is being ... continued below

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46 pages

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Robinson, Allen L.; Pandis, Spyros N. & Davidson, Cliff I. April 1, 2005.

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Description

This report describes the technical progress made on the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS) during the period of September 2004 through February 2005. Significant progress was made this project period on the analysis of ambient data, source apportionment, and deterministic modeling activities. The major experimental achievement this project period was the characterization of the mercury and fine particle emissions from two modern, large, commercial pulverized coal boilers. This testing completes the field work component of the Source Characterization Activity. This report highlights results from mercury emission measurements made using a dilution sampler. The measurements clearly indicate that mercury is being transformed from an oxidized to an elemental state within the dilution. However, wall effects are significant making it difficult to determine whether or not these changes occur in the gas phase or due to some interaction with the sampler walls. This report also presents results from an analysis that uses spherical aluminum silicate (SAS) particles as a marker for primary PM{sub 2.5} emitted from coal combustion. Primary emissions from coal combustion contribute only a small fraction of the PM{sub 2.5} mass (less than 1.5% in the summer and less than 3% in the winter) at the Pittsburgh site. Ambient SAS concentrations also appear to be reasonably spatially homogeneous. Finally, SAS emission factors measured at pilot-scale are consistent with measurements made at full-scale. This report also presents results from applying the Unmix and PMF models to estimate the contribution of different sources to the PM{sub 2.5} mass concentrations in Pittsburgh using aerosol composition information. Comparison of the two models shows similar source composition and contribution for five factors: crustal material, nitrate, an Fe, Mn, and Zn factor, specialty steel production, and a cadmium factor. PMF found several additional factors. Comparison between source contributions for the similar factors shows reasonable agreement between the two models. The sulfate factor shows the highest contribution to local PM{sub 2.5} with an annual average contribution of approximately 28% (from PMF). The nitrate, crustal material, and primary OC and EC factors also show significant contributions on the order of 10-14%. The sulfate factor is affected by photochemistry and therefore shows maximum values in summer.

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46 pages

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OSTI as DE00840468

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Apr 2005

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  • Report No.: NONE
  • Grant Number: FC26-01NT41017
  • DOI: 10.2172/840468 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 840468
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc784833

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  • April 1, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Jan. 17, 2018, 4:37 p.m.

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Robinson, Allen L.; Pandis, Spyros N. & Davidson, Cliff I. ATMOSPHERIC AEROSOL SOURCE-RECEPTOR RELATIONSHIPS: THE ROLE OF COAL-FIRED POWER PLANTS, report, April 1, 2005; [Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc784833/: accessed June 19, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.