Inter-organizational digital divide: Civic groups' media strategies in the Trinity River Corridor Project

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Article on inter-organizational digital divides and civic groups' media strategies in the Trinity River Corridor Project.

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18 p.

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Ignatow, Gabriel & Schuett, Jessica Lynn November 7, 2011.

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UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service

The UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service works to improve the quality of life in local and global communities through education and community outreach programs, preparing students for vital roles in business, social services, and government positions that address important social issues including aging, disability, and health disparity.

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Article on inter-organizational digital divides and civic groups' media strategies in the Trinity River Corridor Project.

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18 p.

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Abstract: This study investigates how leaders of civic groups make decisions about using new and social media versus older forms of media. Drawing from theory and empirical research on the social effects of new media, we focus on whether new media is used in a way that lowers barriers to ordinary citizens' participation in local politics, or else contributes to a "digital divide" between elite and non-elite civic groups. To explore these issues, we conducted interviews with leaders of eight civic groups involved in the Trinity River Corridor development project in Dallas, Texas. We also interviewed local journalists, and analyzed the eight civic groups' Web sites, social media sites, and blogs, as well as blogs that linked to the groups' sites. We find that new and social media were used mainly by organizations that were not directly involved in major political actions, and that for the two groups most directly involved in political actions, the wealthier and more powerful group was better connected to other organizations that did use new and social media. The findings reveal a sharp digital divide between networks of civic organizations.

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  • First Monday, 2011, Chicago: University of Illinois at Chicago. Library

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  • Publication Title: First Monday
  • Volume: 16
  • Issue: 11
  • Pages: 22
  • Peer Reviewed: Yes

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UNT Scholarly Works

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  • November 7, 2011

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  • April 2, 2012, 4:46 p.m.

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  • May 14, 2014, 1:17 p.m.

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Ignatow, Gabriel & Schuett, Jessica Lynn. Inter-organizational digital divide: Civic groups' media strategies in the Trinity River Corridor Project, article, November 7, 2011; [Chicago, Illinois]. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc78305/: accessed June 26, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT College of Public Affairs and Community Service.