High-Precision Floating-Point Arithmetic in ScientificComputation

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At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required: some of these applications require roughly twice this level; others require four times; while still others require hundreds or more digits to obtain numerically meaningful results. Such calculations have been facilitated by new high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. These activities have yielded a number of interesting new scientific results in fields as diverse as quantum theory, climate ... continued below

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Bailey, David H. December 31, 2004.

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Description

At the present time, IEEE 64-bit floating-point arithmetic is sufficiently accurate for most scientific applications. However, for a rapidly growing body of important scientific computing applications, a higher level of numeric precision is required: some of these applications require roughly twice this level; others require four times; while still others require hundreds or more digits to obtain numerically meaningful results. Such calculations have been facilitated by new high-precision software packages that include high-level language translation modules to minimize the conversion effort. These activities have yielded a number of interesting new scientific results in fields as diverse as quantum theory, climate modeling and experimental mathematics, a few of which are described in this article. Such developments suggest that in the future, the numeric precision used for a scientific computation may be as important to the program design as are the algorithms and data structures.

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  • Journal Name: Computing in Science and Engineering; Journal Volume: 7; Journal Issue: 3; Related Information: Journal Publication Date:May-June/2005

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  • Report No.: LBNL--57487
  • Grant Number: DE-AC02-05CH11231
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 860342
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc782880

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  • December 31, 2004

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • April 1, 2016, 8:03 p.m.

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Bailey, David H. High-Precision Floating-Point Arithmetic in ScientificComputation, article, December 31, 2004; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc782880/: accessed August 23, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.