Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation

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The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International ... continued below

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228 Kilobytes pages

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Theilacker, Jay C. July 15, 2004.

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Description

The superconducting Tevatron accelerator at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) has surpassed twenty years of operation. The Tevatron is still the highest energy particle accelerator in the world and will remain so until the commissioning of the LHC in Europe later this decade. The Tevatron has operated in a Fixed Target mode, accelerating a proton beam into stationary targets/detectors, as well as a Colliding Beam mode, continuously colliding counter rotating beams of protons and antiprotons. Upon completion, the Tevatron cryogenic system became the world's largest helium refrigeration system. In 1993, the Tevatron cryogenic system was given the designation of International Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. The operational history, experiences and statistics of the Tevatron, with an emphasis on the cryogenic system, is presented. Improvements, upgrades and current challenges of the cryogenic system are discussed.

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228 Kilobytes pages

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  • Cryogenic Engineering Conference, Anchorage, AK (US), 09/2003

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  • Report No.: FERMILAB-Conf-03/473-AD
  • Grant Number: AC02-76CH03000
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 825898
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc782383

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  • July 15, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Aug. 5, 2016, 3:26 p.m.

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Theilacker, Jay C. Twenty Years of Tevatron Operation, article, July 15, 2004; Batavia, Illinois. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc782383/: accessed August 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.