An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

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The team of the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG) under the leadership of Ross Overbeek, began working on this Project in November 2003. During the previous year, the Project was performed at Integrated Genomics Inc. A transition from the industrial environment to the public domain prompted us to adjust some aspects of the Project. Notwithstanding the challenges, we believe that these adjustments had a strong positive impact on our deliverables. Most importantly, the work of the research team led by R. Overbeek resulted in the deployment of a new open source genomic platform, the SEED (Specific Aim 1). This ... continued below

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Ross Overbeek, Veronika Fonstein, Andrei Osterman, Svetlana Gerdes, Olga Vassieva, Olga Zagnitko, Dmitry Rodionov February 15, 2005.

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Description

The team of the Fellowship for Interpretation of Genomes (FIG) under the leadership of Ross Overbeek, began working on this Project in November 2003. During the previous year, the Project was performed at Integrated Genomics Inc. A transition from the industrial environment to the public domain prompted us to adjust some aspects of the Project. Notwithstanding the challenges, we believe that these adjustments had a strong positive impact on our deliverables. Most importantly, the work of the research team led by R. Overbeek resulted in the deployment of a new open source genomic platform, the SEED (Specific Aim 1). This platform provided a foundation for the development of CyanoSEED a specialized portal to comparative analysis and metabolic reconstruction of all available cyanobacterial genomes (Specific Aim 3). The SEED represents a new generation of software for genome analysis. Briefly, it is a portable and extendable system, containing one of the largest and permanently growing collections of complete and partial genomes. The complete system with annotations and tools is freely available via browsing or via installation on a user's Mac or Linux computer. One of the important unique features of the SEED is the support of metabolic reconstruction and comparative genome analysis via encoding and projection of functional subsystems. During the project period, the FIG research team has validated the new software by developing a significant number of core subsystems, covering many aspects of central metabolism (Specific Aim 2), as well as metabolic areas specific for cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophic organisms (Specific Aim 3). In addition to providing a proof of technology and a starting point for further community-based efforts, these subsystems represent a valuable asset. An extensive coverage of central metabolism provides the bulk of information required for metabolic modeling in Synechocystis sp.PCC 6803. Detailed analysis of several subsystems covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and other cyanobacteria has been performed (Specific Aim 4). The main objectives for this year (adjusted to reflect a new, public domain, setting of the Project research team) were: Aim 1. To develop, test, and deploy a new open source system, the SEED, for integrating community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available microbial genomes. Develop a comprehensive genomic database by integrating within SEED all publicly available complete and nearly complete genome sequences with special emphasis on genomes of cyanobacteria, phototrophic eukaryotes, and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria--invaluable for comparative genomic studies of energy and carbon metabolism in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Aim 2. To develop the SEED's biological content in the form of a collection of encoded Subsystems largely covering the conserved cellular machinery in prokaryotes (and central metabolic machinery in eukaryotes). Aim 3. To develop, utilizing core SEED technology, the CyanoSEED--a specialized WEB portal for community-based annotation, and comparative analysis of all publicly available cyanobacterial genomes. Encode the set of additional subsystems representing key metabolic transformations in cyanobacteria and other photoautotrophs. We envisioned this resource as complementary to other public access databases for comparative genomic analysis currently available to the cyanobacterial research community. Aim 4. Perform in-depth analysis of several subsystems covering energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and all other cyanobacteria with available genome sequences. Reveal inconsistencies and gaps in the current knowledge of these subsystems. Use functional and genome context analysis tools in CyanoSEED to predict, whenever possible, candidate genes for inferred functional roles. To disseminate freely these conjectures and predictions by publishing them on CyanoSEED (http://cyanoseed.thefig.info/) and the Subsystems Forum (http://brucella.uchicago.edu/SubsystemForum/) in order to facilitate experimental analysis by our collaborator on this Project and by other experimentalists working in various field of cyanobacterial physiology and biotechnology.

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  • Report No.: NONE
  • Grant Number: FG02-04ER15499
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 836851
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc782346

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  • February 15, 2005

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Dec. 5, 2016, 9:23 p.m.

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Ross Overbeek, Veronika Fonstein, Andrei Osterman, Svetlana Gerdes, Olga Vassieva, Olga Zagnitko, Dmitry Rodionov. An integrative approach to energy, carbon, and redox metabolism in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, report, February 15, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc782346/: accessed December 17, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.