Could There Be a Hole in Type Ia Supernovae?

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In the favored progenitor scenario, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from a white dwarf accreting material from a non-degenerate companion star. Soon after the white dwarf explodes, the ejected supernova material engulfs the companion star; two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Marietta et al. (2001) show that, in the interaction, the companion star carves out a conical hole of opening angle 30-40 degrees in the supernova ejecta. In this paper we use multi-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to explore the observable consequences of an ejecta-hole asymmetry. We calculate the variation of the spectrum, luminosity, and polarization with viewing angle for ... continued below

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Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R. C. & Wang, Lifan April 23, 2004.

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In the favored progenitor scenario, Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) arise from a white dwarf accreting material from a non-degenerate companion star. Soon after the white dwarf explodes, the ejected supernova material engulfs the companion star; two-dimensional hydrodynamical simulations by Marietta et al. (2001) show that, in the interaction, the companion star carves out a conical hole of opening angle 30-40 degrees in the supernova ejecta. In this paper we use multi-dimensional Monte Carlo radiative transfer calculations to explore the observable consequences of an ejecta-hole asymmetry. We calculate the variation of the spectrum, luminosity, and polarization with viewing angle for the aspherical supernova near maximum light. We find that the supernova looks normal from almost all viewing angles except when one looks almost directly down the hole. In the latter case, one sees into the deeper, hotter layers of ejecta. The supernova is relatively brighter and has a peculiar spectrum characterized by more highly ionized species, weaker absorption features, and lower absorption velocities. The spectrum viewed down the hole is comparable to the class of SN 1991T-like supernovae. We consider how the ejecta-hole asymmetry may explain the current spectropolarimetric observations of SNe Ia, and suggest a few observational signatures of the geometry. Finally, we discuss the variety currently seen in observed SNe Ia and how an ejecta-hole asymmetry may fit in as one of several possible sources of diversity.

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INIS; OSTI as DE00836970

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  • Journal Name: Astrophysical Journal; Journal Volume: 610; Journal Issue: 2 pt1; Other Information: Submitted to Astrophysical Journal: Volume 610, No.2 part 1; Journal Publication Date: 08/01/2004

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  • Report No.: LBNL--54943
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 836970
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc782164

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  • April 23, 2004

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Dec. 11, 2017, 2:33 p.m.

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Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter; Thomas, R. C. & Wang, Lifan. Could There Be a Hole in Type Ia Supernovae?, article, April 23, 2004; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc782164/: accessed April 21, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.