CHEMICAL DECOMPOSITION OF HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE/DISPOSAL GLASSES UNDER IRRADIATION

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In the United States alone there are 100 million gallons of high-level nuclear wastes (HLWs) in various chemical forms awaiting eventual disposal in geologic repositories. For safety in handling and transport from their present underground storage tanks to their final burial sites, much of the HLWs are being immobilized by vitrification. A further virtue of HLW vitrification is the fact that the glass may serve as an additional, non-geologic barrier to the dispersal of these radio-toxins into the environment. For this reason, one of the criteria for selecting HLW glass compositions has been chemical durability against attack by ground water. ... continued below

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Griscom, Daavid L. & Merzbacher, Celia I. December 31, 1999.

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Description

In the United States alone there are 100 million gallons of high-level nuclear wastes (HLWs) in various chemical forms awaiting eventual disposal in geologic repositories. For safety in handling and transport from their present underground storage tanks to their final burial sites, much of the HLWs are being immobilized by vitrification. A further virtue of HLW vitrification is the fact that the glass may serve as an additional, non-geologic barrier to the dispersal of these radio-toxins into the environment. For this reason, one of the criteria for selecting HLW glass compositions has been chemical durability against attack by ground water. While the effects of radiation on chemical durability have therefore been studied extensively, little consideration has been given to the possibility that self-irradiation of HLW glasses may lead to modes of chemical decomposition which render them unstable even in the absence of exposure to ground water. The worst-case threat would occur if the HLW glasses were to respond to irradiation in ways analogous to rock salt (NaCl). It has long been known that alkali halides irradiated to

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  • Other Information: PBD: 31 Dec 1999

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  • Report No.: EMSP-55188
  • Grant Number: A107-96ER45619
  • DOI: 10.2172/828067 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 828067
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc782161

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • December 31, 1999

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • April 21, 2016, 4:48 p.m.

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Griscom, Daavid L. & Merzbacher, Celia I. CHEMICAL DECOMPOSITION OF HIGH-LEVEL NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE/DISPOSAL GLASSES UNDER IRRADIATION, report, December 31, 1999; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc782161/: accessed October 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.