Microbial Metabolite Production for Accelerated Metal and Radionuclide Bioremediation (Microbial Metabolite Production Report)

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Description

Biogeochemical activity is an ongoing and dynamic process due to bacterial activity in the subsurface. Bacteria contribute significantly to biotransformation of metals and radionuclides. As basic science reveals more information about specific mechanisms of bacterial-metal reduction, an even greater contribution of bacteria to biogeochemical activities is realized. An understanding and application of the mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction offers tremendous potential for development into bioremedial processes and technologies. Most bacteria are capable of biogeochemical transformation as a result of meeting nutrient requirements. These assimilatory mechanisms for metals transformation include production of small molecules that serve as electron shuttles for ... continued below

Physical Description

vp.

Creation Information

TURICK, CHARLES September 21, 2004.

Context

This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. It has been viewed 13 times . More information about this report can be viewed below.

Who

People and organizations associated with either the creation of this report or its content.

Sponsor

Publisher

Provided By

UNT Libraries Government Documents Department

Serving as both a federal and a state depository library, the UNT Libraries Government Documents Department maintains millions of items in a variety of formats. The department is a member of the FDLP Content Partnerships Program and an Affiliated Archive of the National Archives.

Contact Us

What

Descriptive information to help identify this report. Follow the links below to find similar items on the Digital Library.

Description

Biogeochemical activity is an ongoing and dynamic process due to bacterial activity in the subsurface. Bacteria contribute significantly to biotransformation of metals and radionuclides. As basic science reveals more information about specific mechanisms of bacterial-metal reduction, an even greater contribution of bacteria to biogeochemical activities is realized. An understanding and application of the mechanisms of metal and radionuclide reduction offers tremendous potential for development into bioremedial processes and technologies. Most bacteria are capable of biogeochemical transformation as a result of meeting nutrient requirements. These assimilatory mechanisms for metals transformation include production of small molecules that serve as electron shuttles for metal reduction. This contribution to biogeochemistry is small however due to only trace requirements for minerals by bacteria. Dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria (DMRB) reduce oxidized metals and insoluble mineral oxides as a means for biological energy production during growth. These types of bacteria offer considerable potential for bioremediation of environments contaminated with toxic metals and radionuclides because of the relatively large amount of metal biotransformation they require for growth. One of the mechanisms employed by some DMRB for electron transfer to insoluble metal oxides is melanin production. The electrochemical properties of melanin provide this polymeric, humic-type compound with electron shuttling properties. Melanin, specifically, pyomelanin, increases the rate and degree of metal reduction in DMRB as a function of pyomelanin concentration. Due to its electron shuttling behavior, only low femtogram quantities per cell are required to significantly increase metal reduction capacity of DMRB. Melanin production is not limited to DMRB. In fact melanin is one of the most common pigments produced by biological systems. Numerous soil microorganisms produce melanin, contributing to about 2-4 percent of the humic fraction of soils. Our recent work has shown that melanin production by one species of bacteria could be used by other species for metal reduction. This melanin ''sharing'' is the area of focus for this project. In addition, melanin contributes to significant increases in metal reduction by both assimilatory and dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria. Stimulation of melanin production in the subsurface offers potential for accelerating metal reduction. Another focus of this project was to determine the potential of melanin production in portions of the Tims Branch watershed as it relates to metal and radionuclide immobilization in-situ.

Physical Description

vp.

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 21 Sep 2004

Language

Item Type

Identifier

Unique identifying numbers for this report in the Digital Library or other systems.

  • Report No.: WSRC-MS-2004-00671
  • Grant Number: AC09-96SR18500
  • DOI: 10.2172/835058 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 835058
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc782123

Collections

This report is part of the following collection of related materials.

Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

What responsibilities do I have when using this report?

When

Dates and time periods associated with this report.

Creation Date

  • September 21, 2004

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • May 5, 2016, 4:22 p.m.

Usage Statistics

When was this report last used?

Yesterday: 0
Past 30 days: 2
Total Uses: 13

Interact With This Report

Here are some suggestions for what to do next.

Start Reading

PDF Version Also Available for Download.

Citations, Rights, Re-Use

TURICK, CHARLES. Microbial Metabolite Production for Accelerated Metal and Radionuclide Bioremediation (Microbial Metabolite Production Report), report, September 21, 2004; South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc782123/: accessed December 12, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.