Real Effect or Artifact of Cloud Cover on Aerosol Optical Thickness?

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Aerosol measurements over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud And Radiation Test bed (CART) site under Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program characterize the temporal variability, vertical distribution, and optical properties of aerosols in the region. They were made by the Cimel sunphotometer and Multifilter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR), Raman Lidar, In situ Aerosol Profiling (IAP) flights, and the Aerosol Observing System (AOS). The spatial variability of aerosols relies a network of MFRSR at the Central Facility (CF) and Extended Facilities (EF), together with satellite remote sensing. The current state-of-art satellite-based estimates over land--e.g., MODerate resolution Imaging ... continued below

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Jeong, M.-J. & Li, Z. March 18, 2005.

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Description

Aerosol measurements over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud And Radiation Test bed (CART) site under Department of Energy's (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program characterize the temporal variability, vertical distribution, and optical properties of aerosols in the region. They were made by the Cimel sunphotometer and Multifilter Rotating Shadow-band Radiometer (MFRSR), Raman Lidar, In situ Aerosol Profiling (IAP) flights, and the Aerosol Observing System (AOS). The spatial variability of aerosols relies a network of MFRSR at the Central Facility (CF) and Extended Facilities (EF), together with satellite remote sensing. The current state-of-art satellite-based estimates over land--e.g., MODerate resolution Imaging Scanner (MODIS) aerosol optical thickness--still suffer from large uncertainties. Contamination due to sub-pixel and/or thin cirrus clouds is believed to be one of the major sources of uncertainties. Retrievals near clouds are discouraged to use, which reduces considerably the amount of useful data. In this regard, cloud is considered as an artifact. However, cloud could have a real impact on AOT by changing humidity, which affects aerosol through the aerosol swelling effect. As a preliminary study, we first investigate the effects of cloud cover and humidity on the retrievals of AOT from ground-based Cimel sunphotometer measurements, in order to help us sort out the real influence and artifact. In general, it is very difficult to verify and quantify the effects of cloud on satellite retrieval of aerosol quantities. Speculation and warning of cloud contamination have been made whenever there is a correlation between the retrieved AOT and cloud fraction or their spatial variabilities, while it has also been argued that aerosol humidification effect (AHE) might be at work. The ample measurements available from ARM over the SGP region may allow us to unravel this complex issue. Our ultimate goals are to (1) evaluate various effects on the retrievals of AOT from both satellite and ground sensors; (2) separate artifact from real effect; (3) create ''clean'' aerosol products for studying their direct and indirect effect. Presented are some very preliminary findings.

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OSTI as DE00841617

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  • Fifteenth Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Science Team Meeting, Daytona Beach, FL (US), 03/14/2005--03/18/2005

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  • Report No.: none
  • Grant Number: FG02-01ER63166
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 841617
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc781748

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • March 18, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Jan. 2, 2018, 12:29 a.m.

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Jeong, M.-J. & Li, Z. Real Effect or Artifact of Cloud Cover on Aerosol Optical Thickness?, article, March 18, 2005; College Park, Maryland. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc781748/: accessed April 20, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.