Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics

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The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction ... continued below

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Kang, Bruce S. October 10, 2005.

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Description

The objective of this project was to understand and improve high-temperature structural properties of metal-silicide intermetallic alloys. Through research collaboration between the research team at West Virginia University (WVU) and Dr. J.H. Schneibel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), molybdenum silicide alloys were developed at ORNL and evaluated at WVU through atomistic modeling analyses, thermo-mechanical tests, and metallurgical studies. In this study, molybdenum-based alloys were ductilized by dispersing MgAl2O4 or MgO spinel particles. The addition of spinel particles is hypothesized to getter impurities such as oxygen and nitrogen from the alloy matrix with the result of ductility improvement. The introduction of fine dispersions has also been postulated to improve ductility by acting as a dislocation source or reducing dislocation pile-ups at grain boundaries. The spinel particles, on the other hand, can also act as local notches or crack initiation sites, which is detrimental to the alloy mechanical properties. Optimization of material processing condition is important to develop the desirable molybdenum alloys with sufficient room-temperature ductility. Atomistic analyses were conducted to further understand the mechanism of ductility improvement of the molybdenum alloys and the results showed that trace amount of residual oxygen may be responsible for the brittle behavior of the as-cast Mo alloys. For the alloys studied, uniaxial tensile tests were conducted at different loading rates, and at room and elevated temperatures. Thermal cycling effect on the mechanical properties was also studied. Tensile tests for specimens subjected to either ten or twenty thermal cycles were conducted. For each test, a follow-up detailed fractography and microstructural analysis were carried out. The test results were correlated to the size, density, distribution of the spinel particles and processing time. Thermal expansion tests were carried out using thermo-mechanical analyzer (TMA). Results showed that the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) value decreases with the addition of spinel and silicide particles. Thermo-cycling tests showed that molybdenum alloy with 6% wt of spinel (MgAl2O4) developed microcracks which were caused by thermal expansion mismatch between the spinel particles and molybdenum matrix, as well as the processing conditions. Detailed post-mortem studies of microstructures and segregation of impurities to the oxide dispersion/Mo interfaces were conducted using x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS).

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  • Report No.: DOE/SC/01-307
  • Grant Number: FG02-01ER45899
  • DOI: 10.2172/859223 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 859223
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc781526

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  • October 10, 2005

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Aug. 3, 2016, 8:40 p.m.

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Kang, Bruce S. Understanding and Improving High-Temperature Structural Properties of Metal-Silicide Intermetallics, report, October 10, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc781526/: accessed August 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.