Optical and Microcantilever-Based Sensors for Real-Time In Situ Characterization of High-Level Waste

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Fundamental research is being conducted to develop sensors for strontium that can be used in real-time to characterize high-level waste (HLW) process streams. Two fundamentally different approaches are being pursued, which have in common the dependence on highly selective molecular recognition agents. In one approach, an array of chemically selective sensors with sensitive fluorescent probes to signal the presence of the constituent of interest are coupled to fiber optics for remote analytical applications. The second approach employs sensitive microcantilever sensors that have been demonstrated to have unprecedented sensitivity in solution for Cs+ and CrO4 -. Selectivity in microcantilever-based sensors is ... continued below

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Braun, Gilbert M. & Bryan, Samuel June 1, 2002.

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Fundamental research is being conducted to develop sensors for strontium that can be used in real-time to characterize high-level waste (HLW) process streams. Two fundamentally different approaches are being pursued, which have in common the dependence on highly selective molecular recognition agents. In one approach, an array of chemically selective sensors with sensitive fluorescent probes to signal the presence of the constituent of interest are coupled to fiber optics for remote analytical applications. The second approach employs sensitive microcantilever sensors that have been demonstrated to have unprecedented sensitivity in solution for Cs+ and CrO4 -. Selectivity in microcantilever-based sensors is achieved by modifying the surface of a gold-coated cantilever with a monolayer coating of an alkanethiol derivative of the molecular recognition agent. The approaches are complementary since fiber optic sensors can be deployed in the highly alkaline environment of HLW, bu t a method of immobilizing a fluorescent molecular recognition agents in a polymer film or bead on the surface of the optical fiber has yet to be demonstrated. The microcantilever-based sensors function by converting molecular complexation into surface stress, and they have been demonstrated to have the requisite sensitivity. However, we will investigate method of protecting Si or SiN microcantilever sensors in the highly alkaline environment of HLW while maintaining high selectivity. One objective of this project is to develop Sr(II) molecular recognition agents with rapidly established equilibria needed for real-time analysis, and initial research will focus on calixarene-crown ethers as a platform. Sensors for alkali metal ions, hydroxide, and temperature will be part of the array of sensor elements that will be demonstrated in this program for both the cantilever and fiber optic sensor approaches.

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2002

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  • June 1, 2002

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Nov. 3, 2016, 7:39 p.m.

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Braun, Gilbert M. & Bryan, Samuel. Optical and Microcantilever-Based Sensors for Real-Time In Situ Characterization of High-Level Waste, report, June 1, 2002; Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc781315/: accessed August 21, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.