Circulating Fluid-Bed Technology for Advanced Power Systems

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Description

Circulating fluid bed technology offers the advantages of a plug flow, yet well-mixed, and high throughput reactor for power plant applications. The ability to effectively scale these systems in size, geometry, and operating conditions is limited because of the extensive deviation from ideal dilute gas-solids flow behavior (Monazam et al., 2001; Li, 1994). Two fluid computations show promise of accurately simulating the hydrodynamics in the riser circulating fluid bed; however, validation tests for large vessels with materials of interest to the power industry are lacking (Guenther et al., 2002). There is little available data in reactors large enough so that ... continued below

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10 pages

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Shadle, Lawrence J.; Ludlow, J. Christopher; Mei, Joseph S. & Guenther, Christopher November 6, 2001.

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Description

Circulating fluid bed technology offers the advantages of a plug flow, yet well-mixed, and high throughput reactor for power plant applications. The ability to effectively scale these systems in size, geometry, and operating conditions is limited because of the extensive deviation from ideal dilute gas-solids flow behavior (Monazam et al., 2001; Li, 1994). Two fluid computations show promise of accurately simulating the hydrodynamics in the riser circulating fluid bed; however, validation tests for large vessels with materials of interest to the power industry are lacking (Guenther et al., 2002). There is little available data in reactors large enough so that geometry (i.e. entrance, exit, and wall) effects do not dominate the hydrodynamics, yet with sufficiently large particle sizes to allow sufficiently large grid sizes to allow accurate and timely hydrodynamic simulations. To meet this need experimental tests were undertaken with relatively large particles of narrow size distribution in a large enough unit to reduce the contributions of wall effects and light enough to avoid geometry effects. While computational fluid dynamic calculations are capable of generating detailed velocity and density profiles, it is believed that the validation and model development begins with the ability to simulate the global flow regime transitions. The purpose of this research is to generate well-defined test data for model validation and to identify and measure critical parameters needed for these simulations.

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10 pages

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OSTI as DE00832832

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  • Vision 21 Program Review Meeting, Morgantown, WV (US), 11/06/2001--11/07/2001

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  • Report No.: NONE
  • Grant Number: None
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 832832
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc781310

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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  • November 6, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • March 10, 2016, 10:52 p.m.

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Shadle, Lawrence J.; Ludlow, J. Christopher; Mei, Joseph S. & Guenther, Christopher. Circulating Fluid-Bed Technology for Advanced Power Systems, article, November 6, 2001; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc781310/: accessed November 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.