Numerical Simulations of Quantum Many-body Systems

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The goals of our DOE work were to develop numerical tools in order to (1) determine the actual phase of particular many-electron models and (2) to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed phases. Over the years, DOE funds provided support for a number of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who have gone on to continue and extend this effort. Looking back, they were more successful in determining the types of correlations that developed in particular models and less successful in establishing the underlying mechanisms. For example, they found clear evidence for antiferromagnetism, d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}}-pairing correlations, and ... continued below

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Scalapino, Douglas J. Sugar, Robert L. April 20, 1998.

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Description

The goals of our DOE work were to develop numerical tools in order to (1) determine the actual phase of particular many-electron models and (2) to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed phases. Over the years, DOE funds provided support for a number of graduate students and postdoctoral fellows who have gone on to continue and extend this effort. Looking back, they were more successful in determining the types of correlations that developed in particular models and less successful in establishing the underlying mechanisms. For example, they found clear evidence for antiferromagnetism, d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}}-pairing correlations, and stripes in various t-t{prime}-J and Hubbard models. Here, the stripes consisted of 1/2-filled domain walls of holes separated by {pi}-phase shifted antiferromagnetic regions. They found that a next-near-neighbor hopping t{prime} with t{prime}/t > 0 suppressed the stripes and favored the d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}}-pairing correlations. They studied a model of a CuO, 2-leg ladder and found that d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}} correlations formed when the system was doped with either electrons or holes. Another example that they studied was a two-dimensional spin 1/2 easy plane model with a near-neighbor exchange J and a four-site ring exchange K. In this J-K model, as K/J is increased, one moves from XY order to stripe order and to Ising antiferromagnetic order. They are still exploring the unusual transition between the Xy and striped phase. The key feature that we found was that strongly-correlated, many-electron systems are 'delicately balanced' between different possible phases. They also believe that their work provides strong support in favor of Anderson's suggestion that the Hubbard model contains the basic physics of the cuprates. That is, it exhibits antiferromagnetism, d{sub x{sup 3}-y{sup 2}}-pairing correlations, and stripes as the half-filled model is doped with holes. They were not as successful in determining the basic mechanisms. Specifically, they sought to determine the basic pairing mechanism. They tried various approaches and concluded that the spin-fluctuations play a central role. However, it was only recently, with Professor Mark Jarrell (UC) and Dr. Thomas Maier (ORNL), that they have found clear evidence that the pairing is mediated by an S = 1 particle-hole fluctuation.

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  • Report No.: NONE
  • Grant Number: FG03-85ER45197
  • DOI: 10.2172/842398 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 842398
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc781003

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  • April 20, 1998

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Aug. 5, 2016, 8:44 p.m.

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Scalapino, Douglas J. Sugar, Robert L. Numerical Simulations of Quantum Many-body Systems, report, April 20, 1998; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc781003/: accessed August 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.