Novel interferometer spectrometer for sensitive stellar radial velocimetry

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We describe a new kind of stellar radial velocimeter based on the series combination of a wide angle Michelson interferometer and a disperser, and which we call a fringing spectrometer. The simplest instrument response of the interferometer produces smaller instrumental noise, and the low resolution requirements of the disperser allows high efficiency and creates an etendue capability which is two orders of magnitude larger than current radial velocimeters. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and portable. Benchtop tests of an open-air prototype shows the short term instrumental noise to be less than 0.76 m/s. A preliminary zero point drift of 4 ... continued below

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186 KILOBYTES pages

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Erskine, D & Ge, J May 20, 1999.

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Description

We describe a new kind of stellar radial velocimeter based on the series combination of a wide angle Michelson interferometer and a disperser, and which we call a fringing spectrometer. The simplest instrument response of the interferometer produces smaller instrumental noise, and the low resolution requirements of the disperser allows high efficiency and creates an etendue capability which is two orders of magnitude larger than current radial velocimeters. The instrument is compact, inexpensive and portable. Benchtop tests of an open-air prototype shows the short term instrumental noise to be less than 0.76 m/s. A preliminary zero point drift of 4 m/s is already competitive with traditional instruments, in spite of the lack of obvious environmental controls and a known interferometer cavity length drift. We are currently installing cavity stabilization and other improvements that will lead to testing on starlight.

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186 KILOBYTES pages

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  • International Conference on Imaging the Universe in Three Dimensions, Walnut Creek, CA (US), 03/29/1999--04/01/1999; Other Information: PBD: 20 May 1999

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  • Report No.: UCRL-JC-134314
  • Report No.: 98-ERD-054
  • Report No.: YN0100000
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 8423
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc780974

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  • May 20, 1999

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • May 6, 2016, 4:11 p.m.

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Erskine, D & Ge, J. Novel interferometer spectrometer for sensitive stellar radial velocimetry, article, May 20, 1999; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc780974/: accessed August 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.