Replacing chemicals in recycle mills with mechanical alternatives

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Description

A high-intensity spark fired underwater decomposes a small amount of the water into hydroxyl radicals, which are strong oxidants. These are able to oxidize contaminants such as glue and wood pitch that enter paper recycling mills as a part of the incoming furnish and cost the industry several hundred million dollars. The sparking technique is safe, inexpensive, and is capable of treating large volumes of water, which makes it attractive for mill applications. Several mill trials were run. Sparking caused a decrease in the tack of the deposits in one case. Lower bleach use occurred in two other mills; sparking ... continued below

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53 pages

Creation Information

Technology, Institute of Paper Science July 1, 2002.

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This report is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this report can be viewed below.

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Description

A high-intensity spark fired underwater decomposes a small amount of the water into hydroxyl radicals, which are strong oxidants. These are able to oxidize contaminants such as glue and wood pitch that enter paper recycling mills as a part of the incoming furnish and cost the industry several hundred million dollars. The sparking technique is safe, inexpensive, and is capable of treating large volumes of water, which makes it attractive for mill applications. Several mill trials were run. Sparking caused a decrease in the tack of the deposits in one case. Lower bleach use occurred in two other mills; sparking reduced the degree of ink reattachment to fiber. The payback for either application is attractive. Sparking induced deposition of contaminants in another mill, which is a positive development--if it can be controlled. The technique is also able to degas water and to oxidize odor-causing sulfur compounds. Although one unit has been purchased by a mill, second-order effects caused by the technology needs to be defined further before the technology can be broadly applied.

Physical Description

53 pages

Notes

OSTI as DE00828245

Source

  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Jul 2002

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  • Report No.: DE-FC36-99GO10381
  • Grant Number: FC36-99GO10381
  • DOI: 10.2172/828245 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 828245
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc780973

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Creation Date

  • July 1, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

Description Last Updated

  • Aug. 9, 2016, 8:22 p.m.

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Technology, Institute of Paper Science. Replacing chemicals in recycle mills with mechanical alternatives, report, July 1, 2002; Golden, Colorado. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc780973/: accessed August 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.