Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays

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The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, ... continued below

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17 p.

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Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A. & Freitas, B.L. January 1, 1995.

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Description

The ability to condition the radiance of laser diodes using shaped-fiber cylindrical-microlens technology has dramatically increased the number of applications that can be practically engaged by diode laser arrays. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has actively pursued optical efficiency and engineering improvements in this technology in an effort to supply large radiance-conditioned laser diode array sources for its own internal programs. This effort has centered on the development of a modular integrated laser diode packaging technology with the goal of enabling the simple and flexible construction of high average power, high density, two-dimensional arrays with integrated cylindrical microlenses. Within LLNL, the principal applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays are as high intensity pump sources for diode pumped solid state lasers (DPSSLs). A simple end-pumping architecture has been developed and demonstrated that allows the radiation from microlens-conditioned, two-dimensional diode array apertures to be efficiently delivered to the end of rod lasers. To date, pump powers as high as 2.5 kW have been delivered to 3 mm diameter laser rods. Such high power levels are critical for pumping solid state lasers in which the terminal laser level is a Stark level lying in the ground state manifold. Previously, such systems have often required operation of the solid state gain medium at low temperature to freeze out the terminal laser Stark level population. The authors recently developed high intensity pump sources overcome this difficulty by effectively pumping to much higher inversion levels, allowing efficient operation at or near room temperature. Because the end-pumping technology is scalable in absolute power, the number of rare-earth ions and transitions that can be effectively accessed for use in practical DPSSL systems has grown tremendously.

Physical Description

17 p.

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OSTI as DE95014158

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  • SPIE `95: SPIE conference on optics, electro-optics, and laser application in science, engineering and medicine, San Jose, CA (United States), 5-14 Feb 1995

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  • Other: DE95014158
  • Report No.: UCRL-JC--119257
  • Report No.: CONF-950226--53
  • Grant Number: W-7405-ENG-48
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 82316
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc780669

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  • January 1, 1995

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Feb. 23, 2016, 1:05 p.m.

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Beach, R.J.; Emanuel, M.A. & Freitas, B.L. Applications of microlens-conditioned laser diode arrays, article, January 1, 1995; California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc780669/: accessed October 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.