Historical background: Why is it important to improve automated particle selection methods?

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A current trend in single-particle electron microscopy is to compute three-dimensional reconstructions with ever-increasing numbers of particles in the data sets. Since manual--or even semi-automated--selection of particles represents a major bottleneck when the data set exceeds several thousand particles, there is growing interest in developing automatic methods for selecting images of individual particles. Except in special cases, however, it has proven difficult to achieve the degree of efficiency and reliability that would make fully automated particle selection a useful tool. The simplest methods such as cross correlation (i.e., matched filtering) do not perform well enough to be used for fully ... continued below

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11 pages

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Glaeser, Robert M. August 14, 2003.

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A current trend in single-particle electron microscopy is to compute three-dimensional reconstructions with ever-increasing numbers of particles in the data sets. Since manual--or even semi-automated--selection of particles represents a major bottleneck when the data set exceeds several thousand particles, there is growing interest in developing automatic methods for selecting images of individual particles. Except in special cases, however, it has proven difficult to achieve the degree of efficiency and reliability that would make fully automated particle selection a useful tool. The simplest methods such as cross correlation (i.e., matched filtering) do not perform well enough to be used for fully automated particle selection. Geometric properties (area, perimeter-to-area ratio, etc.) and the integrated ''mass'' of candidate particles are additional factors that could improve automated particle selection if suitable methods of contouring particles could be developed. Another suggestion is that data be always collected as pairs of images, the first taken at low defocus (to capture information at the highest possible resolution) and the second at very high defocus (to improve the visibility of the particle). Finally, it is emphasized that well-annotated, open-access data sets need to be established in order to encourage the further development and validation of methods for automated particle selection.

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11 pages

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OSTI as DE00836670

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  • Journal Name: Journal of Structural Biology; Journal Volume: 145; Other Information: Submitted to Journal of Structural Biology: Volume 145; Journal Publication Date: 2004

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  • Report No.: LBNL--53892
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 836670
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc780177

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  • August 14, 2003

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Sept. 25, 2017, 4:08 p.m.

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Glaeser, Robert M. Historical background: Why is it important to improve automated particle selection methods?, article, August 14, 2003; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc780177/: accessed December 15, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.