Enhancing the soil organic matter pool through biomass incorporation.

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A study was installed in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA, that sought to examine the impact of incorporating downed slash materials into subsoil layers on soil chemical and physical properties as compared with the effect of slash materials left on the soil surface. Baseline levels of slash were estimated by establishing transects within harvested stands and estimating the quantity of down wood and stumps. An equivalent quantity of biomass and two times the baseline levels were incorporated into subsurface soil layers by a CMI RS 500B reclaimer/stabilizer. Two sites were examined which differed in soil textural composition: ... continued below

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13 p.

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Sanchez, Felipe, G.; Carter, Emily, A. & Klepac, John, F. June 11, 2003.

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  • Savannah River Forest Station
    Publisher Info: USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC
    Place of Publication: New Ellenton, South Carolina

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Description

A study was installed in the Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina, USA, that sought to examine the impact of incorporating downed slash materials into subsoil layers on soil chemical and physical properties as compared with the effect of slash materials left on the soil surface. Baseline levels of slash were estimated by establishing transects within harvested stands and estimating the quantity of down wood and stumps. An equivalent quantity of biomass and two times the baseline levels were incorporated into subsurface soil layers by a CMI RS 500B reclaimer/stabilizer. Two sites were examined which differed in soil textural composition: sandy vs. clay. Site differences had no impact on machine productivity and machine costs were estimated at $US 521 ha-1 and $US 633 ha-1 on the ''sandy'' and ''clay'' sites, respectively. The feasibility of the CM1 for biomass incorporation is low due to high unit area costs but increased machine productivity would reduce costs and improve its potential. Biomass incorporation improved carbon and nutrient content of each site, especially on the sandy site. Slash levels had an impact on nutrient content but the differences were not statistically significant. For the sandy site, improvements in soil physical properties were evident in response to incorporation and machine planting operations. Bulk density and soil strength were reduced in response to biomass incorporation and tillage to levels that would not limit root production. The differences in soil physical response between incorporated treatments were minimal and not statistically significant.

Physical Description

13 p.

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  • Journal Name: Biomass & Energy; Journal Volume: 24

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  • Report No.: na
  • Grant Number: AI09-00SR22188
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 835179
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc779883

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is the Department of Energy (DOE) office that collects, preserves, and disseminates DOE-sponsored research and development (R&D) results that are the outcomes of R&D projects or other funded activities at DOE labs and facilities nationwide and grantees at universities and other institutions.

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Creation Date

  • June 11, 2003

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • April 3, 2017, 7:49 p.m.

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Sanchez, Felipe, G.; Carter, Emily, A. & Klepac, John, F. Enhancing the soil organic matter pool through biomass incorporation., article, June 11, 2003; New Ellenton, South Carolina. (https://digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc779883/: accessed April 19, 2019), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, https://digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.