Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems.

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Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua ... continued below

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29 pp

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Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R. & Mattson, W., J. January 1, 2005.

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This article is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this article can be viewed below.

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  • Savannah River Forest Station
    Publisher Info: USDA Forest Service, Savannah River, New Ellenton, SC
    Place of Publication: New Ellenton, South Carolina

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Annu. Rev. Entomol. 50:1-29. Abstract Increasing demand for wood and wood products is putting stress on traditional forest production areas, leading to long-term economic and environmental concerns. Intensively managed hardwood forest systems (IMHFS), grown using conventional agricultural as well as forestry methods, can help alleviate potential problems in natural forest production areas. Although IMHFS can produce more biomass per hectare per year than natural forests, the ecologically simplified, monocultural systems may greatly increase the crops susceptibility to pests. Species in the genera Populus and Salix comprise the greatest acreage in IMHFS in North America, but other species, including Liquidambar styracifua and Platanus occidentalis, are also important. We discuss life histories, realized and potential damage, and management options for the most economically infuential pests that affect these hardwood species. The substantial inherent challenges associated with pest management in the monocultural environments created by IMHFS are reviewed. Finally, we discuss ways to design IMHFS that may reduce their susceptibility to pests, increase their growth and productivity potential, and create a more sustainable environment.

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29 pp

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  • Journal Name: Annu. Rev. Entomol.; Journal Volume: 50

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  • Report No.: na
  • Grant Number: AI09-00SR22188
  • DOI: 10.1146/annurev.ento.50.071803.130431 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 835567
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc779846

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  • January 1, 2005

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Nov. 1, 2016, 6 p.m.

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Coyle, David R.; Nebeker, T., E.; Hart, E., R. & Mattson, W., J. Biology and management of insect pests in North American intensively managed hardwood forest systems., article, January 1, 2005; New Ellenton, South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc779846/: accessed August 18, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.