Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

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This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a ... continued below

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50 pages

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Magee, Steve & Gehman, Richard July 12, 2005.

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Description

This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

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50 pages

Notes

OSTI as DE00841411

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  • Other Information: PBD: 12 Jul 2005

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  • Report No.: DOE-AL67615
  • Grant Number: FC36-02AL67615
  • DOI: 10.2172/841411 | External Link
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 841411
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc779677

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

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Creation Date

  • July 12, 2005

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • June 13, 2016, 3:52 p.m.

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Magee, Steve & Gehman, Richard. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems, report, July 12, 2005; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc779677/: accessed June 22, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.