High resolution airborne geophysics at hazardous waste disposal sites

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In 1994, a high resolution helicopter geophysical survey was conducted over portions of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The 1800 line kilometer survey included multi-frequency electromagnetic and magnetic sensors. The areas covered by the high resolution portion of the survey were selected on the basis of their importance to the environmental restoration effort and on data obtained from the reconnaissance phase of the airborne survey in which electromagnetic, magnetic, and radiometric data were collected over the entire Oak Ridge Reservation in 1992--1993. The high resolution phase had lower sensor heights, more and higher EM frequencies, and tighter line spacings than ... continued below

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10 p.

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Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Chong Foo, M. & Gamey, T.J. June 1, 1995.

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Description

In 1994, a high resolution helicopter geophysical survey was conducted over portions of the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. The 1800 line kilometer survey included multi-frequency electromagnetic and magnetic sensors. The areas covered by the high resolution portion of the survey were selected on the basis of their importance to the environmental restoration effort and on data obtained from the reconnaissance phase of the airborne survey in which electromagnetic, magnetic, and radiometric data were collected over the entire Oak Ridge Reservation in 1992--1993. The high resolution phase had lower sensor heights, more and higher EM frequencies, and tighter line spacings than did the reconnaissance survey. When flying over exceptionally clear areas, the high resolution bird came within a few meters of the ground surface. Unfortunately, even sparse trees and power or phone lines could prevent the bird from being towed safely at low altitude, and over such areas it was more usual for it to be flown at about the same altitude as the bird in the reconnaissance survey, about 30m. Even so, the magnetometers used in the high resolution phase were 20m closer to the ground than in the reconnaissance phase because they were mounted on the tail of the bird rather than on the tow cable above the bird. The EM frequencies used in the high resolution survey ranged from 7400Hz to 67000Hz. Only the horizontal coplanar loop configuration was used in the high resolution flyovers.

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10 p.

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OSTI as DE95013050

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  • 8. annual symposium on the application of geophysics to environmental and engineering problems, Orlando, FL (United States), 23-27 Apr 1995

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  • Other: DE95013050
  • Report No.: CONF-950450--10
  • Grant Number: AC05-84OR21400
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 82458
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc779623

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • June 1, 1995

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Jan. 19, 2016, 2:26 p.m.

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Beard, L.P.; Nyquist, J.E.; Doll, W.E.; Chong Foo, M. & Gamey, T.J. High resolution airborne geophysics at hazardous waste disposal sites, article, June 1, 1995; Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc779623/: accessed November 20, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.