Radon Reduction Experience at a Former Uranium Processing Facility

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Approximately 6,200 cubic meters of waste containing about 2.0E8 MBq of radium-226 are stored in two large silos at the Fernald Site in southwest Ohio. The material is scheduled for retrieval, packaging, off site shipment and disposal by burial. Air in the silos above the stored material contained radon-222 at a concentration of 7.4 E5 Bq/L. Short-lived daughters formed by decay in these headspaces generated dose rates at contact with the top of the silos up to 1.05 mSv/hr and there complicate the process of retrieval. A Radon Control System (RCS) employing carbon adsorption beds has been designed under contract ... continued below

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Eger, K. J.; Rutherford, L.; Rickett, K.; Fellman, R. & Hungate, S. February 29, 2004.

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Approximately 6,200 cubic meters of waste containing about 2.0E8 MBq of radium-226 are stored in two large silos at the Fernald Site in southwest Ohio. The material is scheduled for retrieval, packaging, off site shipment and disposal by burial. Air in the silos above the stored material contained radon-222 at a concentration of 7.4 E5 Bq/L. Short-lived daughters formed by decay in these headspaces generated dose rates at contact with the top of the silos up to 1.05 mSv/hr and there complicate the process of retrieval. A Radon Control System (RCS) employing carbon adsorption beds has been designed under contract with the Fluor Fernald to remove most of the radon in the headspaces and maintain lower concentrations during periods when work on or above the domes is needed. Removing the radon also removes the short-lived daughters and reduces the dose rate near the domes to 20 to 30 {mu}Sv/hr. Failing to remove the radon would be costly, in the exposure of personnel needed to work extended periods at these moderate dose rates, or in dollars for the application of remote retrieval techniques. In addition, the RCS minimizes the potential for environmental releases. This paper describes the RCS, its mode of operation, and early experiences. The results of the test described herein and the experience gained from operation of the RCS during its first phase of continuous operation, will be used to determine the best air flow, and air flow distribution, the most desirable number and sequence number and sequence of adsorption beds to be used and the optimum application of air recycle within the RCS.

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INIS; OSTI as DE00823676

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  • Waste Management 2004 Conference, Tucson, AZ (US), 02/29/2004--03/04/2004

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  • Report No.: FEMP-2610
  • Grant Number: AC24-01OH20115
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 823676
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc779243

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • February 29, 2004

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • Sept. 21, 2017, 9:21 p.m.

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Eger, K. J.; Rutherford, L.; Rickett, K.; Fellman, R. & Hungate, S. Radon Reduction Experience at a Former Uranium Processing Facility, article, February 29, 2004; United States. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc779243/: accessed December 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.