Hybrid Actuators for Enhanced Automation in D&D Remote Systems Tasks

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Description

Revolutionary changes in both the design and control of manipulation systems are required to enable autonomous operations in unstructured environments, as those defined for D&D tasks. Many researchers are exploring issues associated with the control of existing manipulation systems, but there is very little research effort directed towards enabling technologies that will provide significant improvement in the mechanical performance of these systems. Neither advanced controls or improved mechanical performance alone will enable a revolutionary new class of manipulation systems. The best control algorithms will not expand the performance of an actuated system beyond its physical limitations. The focus of this ... continued below

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Jansen, John F. June 1, 2002.

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  • Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Publisher Info: Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
    Place of Publication: Oak Ridge, Tennessee

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Description

Revolutionary changes in both the design and control of manipulation systems are required to enable autonomous operations in unstructured environments, as those defined for D&D tasks. Many researchers are exploring issues associated with the control of existing manipulation systems, but there is very little research effort directed towards enabling technologies that will provide significant improvement in the mechanical performance of these systems. Neither advanced controls or improved mechanical performance alone will enable a revolutionary new class of manipulation systems. The best control algorithms will not expand the performance of an actuated system beyond its physical limitations. The focus of this research is to explore advanced actuation methodologies that have the performance and capacity required for a revolutionary new class of manipulation systems that will enable autonomous operations in D&D environments. There are three fundamental goals associated with achieving the required breakthroughs in actuation technology.

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  • Other Information: PBD: 1 Jun 2002

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  • June 1, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • April 21, 2016, 2:11 p.m.

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Jansen, John F. Hybrid Actuators for Enhanced Automation in D&D Remote Systems Tasks, report, June 1, 2002; Oak Ridge, Tennessee. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc778035/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.