PVC Pipe Samplers for Hylid Frogs: A Cautionary Note

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When such is available, many hylid frogs use artificial refugia, and this trait is frequently used as a basis for sampling populations of these frogs. Artificial refugia are any manmade objects that the animals may use for shelter (e.g. bird houses, bamboo stakes, lengths of pipe, etc.). By choosing refugia that the animals will readily enter and from which they may be easily removed, sampling can be directed toward particular species or size classes. Several variables have been considered when examining bias in sampling using these refugia. Among these variables are inside diameter of the pipes, pipe length, associated vegetation ... continued below

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MARTIN, FLOYD April 7, 2004.

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When such is available, many hylid frogs use artificial refugia, and this trait is frequently used as a basis for sampling populations of these frogs. Artificial refugia are any manmade objects that the animals may use for shelter (e.g. bird houses, bamboo stakes, lengths of pipe, etc.). By choosing refugia that the animals will readily enter and from which they may be easily removed, sampling can be directed toward particular species or size classes. Several variables have been considered when examining bias in sampling using these refugia. Among these variables are inside diameter of the pipes, pipe length, associated vegetation and height above ground. Our observations were not intended as an evaluation of polyvinyl chloride pipe traps as a sampling technique but rather were part of a study examining invertebrate and amphibian faunas associated with slope wetlands. Slope wetlands are wetlands formed where soil contours favor outcropping of water to the surface to form pools or channels often connected to streams. Despite the apparently small amount of appropriate data in this study, there are few enough quantified or semi-quantified data on this topic to be worth a cautionary note.

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  • Journal Name: Herpetological Natural History

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  • Report No.: WSRC-MS-2004-00128
  • Grant Number: AC09-96SR18500
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 822826
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc776900

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  • April 7, 2004

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  • Dec. 3, 2015, 9:30 a.m.

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  • May 5, 2016, 6:11 p.m.

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MARTIN, FLOYD. PVC Pipe Samplers for Hylid Frogs: A Cautionary Note, article, April 7, 2004; South Carolina. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc776900/: accessed September 24, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.