Light-ion therapy in the U.S.: From the Bevalac to ??

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While working with E.O. Lawrence at Berkeley, R.R. Wilson in 1946 noted the potential for using the Bragg-peak of protons (or heavier ions) for radiation therapy. Thus began the long history of contributions from Berkeley to this field. Pioneering work by C.A. Tobias et al at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron led ultimately to clinical applications of proton and helium beams, with over 1000 patients treated through 1974 with high-energy plateau radiation; placing the treatment volume (mostly pituitary fields) at the rotational center of a sophisticated patient positioner. In 1974 the SuperHILAC and Bevatron accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory were joined ... continued below

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Alonso, Jose R. & Castro, Joseph R. September 24, 2002.

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While working with E.O. Lawrence at Berkeley, R.R. Wilson in 1946 noted the potential for using the Bragg-peak of protons (or heavier ions) for radiation therapy. Thus began the long history of contributions from Berkeley to this field. Pioneering work by C.A. Tobias et al at the 184-Inch Synchrocyclotron led ultimately to clinical applications of proton and helium beams, with over 1000 patients treated through 1974 with high-energy plateau radiation; placing the treatment volume (mostly pituitary fields) at the rotational center of a sophisticated patient positioner. In 1974 the SuperHILAC and Bevatron accelerators at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory were joined by the construction of a 250-meter transfer line, forming the Bevalac, a facility capable of accelerating ions of any atomic species to relativistic energies. With the advent of these new beams, and better diagnostic tools capable of more precise definition of tumor volume and determination of the stopping point of charged-particle beams, large-field Bragg-peak therapy with ion beams became a real possibility. A dedicated Biomedical experimental area was developed, ultimately consisting of three distinct irradiation stations; two dedicated to therapy and one to radiobiology and biophysics. These facilities included dedicated support areas for patient setup and staging of animal and cell samples, and a central control area linked to the main Bevatron control room.

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INIS; OSTI as DE00803872

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  • XVIeme congres d'economie de la sante de l'AEA: Sante et Regionalisation, Ajaccio, Corsica (FR), 10/10/2002--10/11/2002

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  • Report No.: LBNL--51559
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 803872
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc743252

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • September 24, 2002

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  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

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  • April 4, 2016, 1:29 p.m.

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Alonso, Jose R. & Castro, Joseph R. Light-ion therapy in the U.S.: From the Bevalac to ??, article, September 24, 2002; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc743252/: accessed November 19, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.