The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS)

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During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom ... continued below

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Drummond, L.A. & Marques, O. May 21, 2002.

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During the past decades there has been a continuous growth in the number of physical and societal problems that have been successfully studied and solved by means of computational modeling and simulation. Distinctively, a number of these are important scientific problems ranging in scale from the atomic to the cosmic. For example, ionization is a phenomenon as ubiquitous in modern society as the glow of fluorescent lights and the etching on silicon computer chips; but it was not until 1999 that researchers finally achieved a complete numerical solution to the simplest example of ionization, the collision of a hydrogen atom with an electron. On the opposite scale, cosmologists have long wondered whether the expansion of the Universe, which began with the Big Bang, would ever reverse itself, ending the Universe in a Big Crunch. In 2000, analysis of new measurements of the cosmic microwave background radiation showed that the geometry of the Universe is flat, and thus the Universe will continue expanding forever. Both of these discoveries depended on high performance computer simulations that utilized computational tools included in the Advanced Computational Testing and Simulation (ACTS) Toolkit. The ACTS Toolkit is an umbrella project that brought together a number of general purpose computational tool development projects funded and supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). These tools, which have been developed independently, mainly at DOE laboratories, make it easier for scientific code developers to write high performance applications for parallel computers. They tackle a number of computational issues that are common to a large number of scientific applications, mainly implementation of numerical algorithms, and support for code development, execution and optimization. The ACTS Toolkit Project enables the use of these tools by a much wider community of computational scientists, and promotes code portability, reusability, reduction of duplicate efforts, and tool maturity. This paper presents a brief introduction to the functionality available in ACTS.

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OSTI as DE00797851

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  • Scaling to New Heights Workshop, Pittsburgh, PA (US), 05/21/2002--05/21/2002

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  • Report No.: LBNL--50414
  • Grant Number: AC03-76SF00098
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 797851
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc742125

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Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • May 21, 2002

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

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  • April 1, 2016, 8:35 p.m.

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Drummond, L.A. & Marques, O. The advanced computational testing and simulation toolkit (ACTS), article, May 21, 2002; Berkeley, California. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc742125/: accessed December 16, 2017), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.