Laser Micromachining and Information Discovery Using a Dual Beam Interferometry

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Lasers have proven to be among the most promising tools for micromachining because they can process features down to the size of the laser wavelength (smaller than 1 micrometer) and they provide a non-contact technology for machining. The demand for incorporating in-situ diagnostics technology into the micromachining environment is driven by the increasing need for producing micro-parts of high quality and accuracy. Laser interferometry can be used as an on-line monitoring tool and it is the aim of this work to enhance the understanding and application of Michelson interferometry principle for the in-situ diagnostics of the machining depth on the ... continued below

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1614 Kilobytes pages

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Theppakuttaikomaraswamy, Senthil P. December 31, 2001.

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This thesis or dissertation is part of the collection entitled: Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports and was provided by UNT Libraries Government Documents Department to Digital Library, a digital repository hosted by the UNT Libraries. More information about this document can be viewed below.

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  • Ames Laboratory
    Publisher Info: Ames Lab., IA (United States)
    Place of Publication: Iowa

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Lasers have proven to be among the most promising tools for micromachining because they can process features down to the size of the laser wavelength (smaller than 1 micrometer) and they provide a non-contact technology for machining. The demand for incorporating in-situ diagnostics technology into the micromachining environment is driven by the increasing need for producing micro-parts of high quality and accuracy. Laser interferometry can be used as an on-line monitoring tool and it is the aim of this work to enhance the understanding and application of Michelson interferometry principle for the in-situ diagnostics of the machining depth on the sub-micron and micron scales. micromachining is done on two different materials and a comprehensive investigation is done to control the width and depth of the machined feature. To control the width of the feature, laser micromachining is done on copper and a detailed analysis is performed. The objective of this experiment is to make a precision mask for sputtering with an array of holes on it using an Nd:YAG laser of 532 nm wavelength. The diameter of the hole is 50 {micro}m and the spacing between holes (the distance between the centers) is 100 {micro}m. Michelson interferometer is integrated with a laser machining system to control the depth of machining. An excimer laser of 308 nm wavelength is used for micromachining. A He-Ne laser of 632.8 nm wavelength is used as the light source for the interferometer. Interference patterns are created due to the change in the path length between the two interferometer arms. The machined depth information is obtained from the interference patterns on an oscilloscope detected by a photodiode. To compare the predicted depth by the interferometer with the true machining depth, a surface profilometer is used to measure the actual machining depth on the silicon. It is observed that the depths of machining obtained by the surface profile measurement are in accordance with the interferometer measurements with a very high accuracy. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of applying this system in industries that require precise measurements where cost of making as well as accuracy both cannot be compromised.

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1614 Kilobytes pages

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OSTI as DE00803100

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  • Other Information: TH: Thesis (M.S.); Submitted to Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (US)

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  • Report No.: IS-T 1951
  • Grant Number: W-7405-Eng-82
  • Office of Scientific & Technical Information Report Number: 803100
  • Archival Resource Key: ark:/67531/metadc741667

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Office of Scientific & Technical Information Technical Reports

Reports, articles and other documents harvested from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information.

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  • December 31, 2001

Added to The UNT Digital Library

  • Oct. 19, 2015, 7:39 p.m.

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  • Nov. 11, 2015, 6:45 p.m.

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Theppakuttaikomaraswamy, Senthil P. Laser Micromachining and Information Discovery Using a Dual Beam Interferometry, thesis or dissertation, December 31, 2001; Iowa. (digital.library.unt.edu/ark:/67531/metadc741667/: accessed June 25, 2018), University of North Texas Libraries, Digital Library, digital.library.unt.edu; crediting UNT Libraries Government Documents Department.